Melodic interval perception by normal-hearing listeners and cochlear implant users

Xin Luo, Megan E. Masterson, Ching Chih Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The perception of melodic intervals (sequential pitch differences) is essential to music perception. This study tested melodic interval perception in normal-hearing (NH) listeners and cochlear implant (CI) users. Melodic interval ranking was tested using an adaptive procedure. CI users had slightly higher interval ranking thresholds than NH listeners. Both groups' interval ranking thresholds, although not affected by root note, significantly increased with standard interval size and were higher for descending intervals than for ascending intervals. The pitch direction effect may be due to a procedural artifact or a difference in central processing. In another test, familiar melodies were played with all the intervals scaled by a single factor. Subjects rated how in tune the melodies were and adjusted the scaling factor until the melodies sounded the most in tune. CI users had lower final interval ratings and less change in interval rating as a function of scaling factor than NH listeners. For CI users, the root-mean-square error of the final scaling factors and the width of the interval rating function were significantly correlated with the average ranking threshold for ascending rather than descending intervals, suggesting that CI users may have focused on ascending intervals when rating and adjusting the melodies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1831-1844
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume136
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

hearing
intervals
ranking
ratings
Listeners
Hearing
Cochlear Implant
scaling
thresholds
root-mean-square errors
music
artifacts
adjusting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Melodic interval perception by normal-hearing listeners and cochlear implant users. / Luo, Xin; Masterson, Megan E.; Wu, Ching Chih.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 136, No. 4, 01.10.2014, p. 1831-1844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{666b2d442c52462f82760aa7a6b97c42,
title = "Melodic interval perception by normal-hearing listeners and cochlear implant users",
abstract = "The perception of melodic intervals (sequential pitch differences) is essential to music perception. This study tested melodic interval perception in normal-hearing (NH) listeners and cochlear implant (CI) users. Melodic interval ranking was tested using an adaptive procedure. CI users had slightly higher interval ranking thresholds than NH listeners. Both groups' interval ranking thresholds, although not affected by root note, significantly increased with standard interval size and were higher for descending intervals than for ascending intervals. The pitch direction effect may be due to a procedural artifact or a difference in central processing. In another test, familiar melodies were played with all the intervals scaled by a single factor. Subjects rated how in tune the melodies were and adjusted the scaling factor until the melodies sounded the most in tune. CI users had lower final interval ratings and less change in interval rating as a function of scaling factor than NH listeners. For CI users, the root-mean-square error of the final scaling factors and the width of the interval rating function were significantly correlated with the average ranking threshold for ascending rather than descending intervals, suggesting that CI users may have focused on ascending intervals when rating and adjusting the melodies.",
author = "Xin Luo and Masterson, {Megan E.} and Wu, {Ching Chih}",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1121/1.4894738",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "136",
pages = "1831--1844",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Melodic interval perception by normal-hearing listeners and cochlear implant users

AU - Luo, Xin

AU - Masterson, Megan E.

AU - Wu, Ching Chih

PY - 2014/10/1

Y1 - 2014/10/1

N2 - The perception of melodic intervals (sequential pitch differences) is essential to music perception. This study tested melodic interval perception in normal-hearing (NH) listeners and cochlear implant (CI) users. Melodic interval ranking was tested using an adaptive procedure. CI users had slightly higher interval ranking thresholds than NH listeners. Both groups' interval ranking thresholds, although not affected by root note, significantly increased with standard interval size and were higher for descending intervals than for ascending intervals. The pitch direction effect may be due to a procedural artifact or a difference in central processing. In another test, familiar melodies were played with all the intervals scaled by a single factor. Subjects rated how in tune the melodies were and adjusted the scaling factor until the melodies sounded the most in tune. CI users had lower final interval ratings and less change in interval rating as a function of scaling factor than NH listeners. For CI users, the root-mean-square error of the final scaling factors and the width of the interval rating function were significantly correlated with the average ranking threshold for ascending rather than descending intervals, suggesting that CI users may have focused on ascending intervals when rating and adjusting the melodies.

AB - The perception of melodic intervals (sequential pitch differences) is essential to music perception. This study tested melodic interval perception in normal-hearing (NH) listeners and cochlear implant (CI) users. Melodic interval ranking was tested using an adaptive procedure. CI users had slightly higher interval ranking thresholds than NH listeners. Both groups' interval ranking thresholds, although not affected by root note, significantly increased with standard interval size and were higher for descending intervals than for ascending intervals. The pitch direction effect may be due to a procedural artifact or a difference in central processing. In another test, familiar melodies were played with all the intervals scaled by a single factor. Subjects rated how in tune the melodies were and adjusted the scaling factor until the melodies sounded the most in tune. CI users had lower final interval ratings and less change in interval rating as a function of scaling factor than NH listeners. For CI users, the root-mean-square error of the final scaling factors and the width of the interval rating function were significantly correlated with the average ranking threshold for ascending rather than descending intervals, suggesting that CI users may have focused on ascending intervals when rating and adjusting the melodies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84907865399&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84907865399&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1121/1.4894738

DO - 10.1121/1.4894738

M3 - Article

C2 - 25324084

AN - SCOPUS:84907865399

VL - 136

SP - 1831

EP - 1844

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 4

ER -