Megahertz pulse trains enable multi-hit serial femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free electron lasers

Susannah Holmes, Henry J. Kirkwood, Richard Bean, Klaus Giewekemeyer, Andrew V. Martin, Marjan Hadian-Jazi, Max O. Wiedorn, Dominik Oberthür, Hugh Marman, Luigi Adriano, Nasser Al-Qudami, Saša Bajt, Imrich Barák, Sadia Bari, Johan Bielecki, Sandor Brockhauser, Mathew A. Coleman, Francisco Cruz-Mazo, Cyril Danilevski, Katerina DörnerAlfonso M. Gañán-Calvo, Rita Graceffa, Hans Fanghor, Michael Heymann, Matthias Frank, Alexander Kaukher, Yoonhee Kim, Bostjan Kobe, Juraj Knoška, Torsten Laurus, Romain Letrun, Luis Maia, Marc Messerschmidt, Markus Metz, Thomas Michelat, Grant Mills, Serguei Molodtsov, Diana C.F. Monteiro, Andrew J. Morgan, Astrid Münnich, Gisel E. Peña Murillo, Gianpietro Previtali, Adam Round, Tokushi Sato, Robin Schubert, Joachim Schulz, Megan Shelby, Carolin Seuring, Jonas A. Sellberg, Marcin Sikorski, Alessandro Silenzi, Stephan Stern, Jola Sztuk-Dambietz, Janusz Szuba, Martin Trebbin, Patrick Vagovic, Thomas Ve, Britta Weinhausen, Krzysztof Wrona, Paul Lourdu Xavier, Chen Xu, Oleksandr Yefanov, Keith A. Nugent, Henry N. Chapman, Adrian P. Mancuso, Anton Barty, Brian Abbey, Connie Darmanin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) and Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) II are extremely intense sources of X-rays capable of generating Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SFX) data at megahertz (MHz) repetition rates. Previous work has shown that it is possible to use consecutive X-ray pulses to collect diffraction patterns from individual crystals. Here, we exploit the MHz pulse structure of the European XFEL to obtain two complete datasets from the same lysozyme crystal, first hit and the second hit, before it exits the beam. The two datasets, separated by <1 µs, yield up to 2.1 Å resolution structures. Comparisons between the two structures reveal no indications of radiation damage or significant changes within the active site, consistent with the calculated dose estimates. This demonstrates MHz SFX can be used as a tool for tracking sub-microsecond structural changes in individual single crystals, a technique we refer to as multi-hit SFX.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4708
JournalNature communications
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • General
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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