Mediation designs for tobacco prevention research

David Mackinnon, Marcia P. Taborga, Antonio A. Morgan-Lopez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes research designs and statistical analyses to investigate how tobacco prevention programs achieve their effects on tobacco use. A theoretical approach to program development and evaluation useful for any prevention program guides the analysis. The theoretical approach focuses on action theory for how the program affects mediating variables and on conceptual theory for how mediating variables are related to tobacco use. Information on the mediating mechanisms by which tobacco prevention programs achieve effects is useful for the development of efficient programs and provides a test of the theoretical basis of prevention efforts. Examples of these potential mediating mechanisms are described including mediated effects through attitudes, social norms, beliefs about positive consequences, and accessibility to tobacco. Prior research provides evidence that changes in social norms are a critical mediating mechanism for successful tobacco prevention. Analysis of mediating variables in single group designs with multiple mediators are described as well as multiple group randomized designs which are the most likely to accurately uncover important mediating mechanisms. More complicated dismantling and constructive designs are described and illustrated based on current findings from tobacco research. Mediation analysis for categorical outcomes and more complicated statistical methods are outlined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume68
Issue numberSUPPL.
StatePublished - Nov 1 2002

Fingerprint

Tobacco
nicotine
mediation
Research
Program Development
Tobacco Use
Social Norms
Program Evaluation
program guide
action theory
dismantling
Research Design
statistical method
research planning
Statistical methods
Group
evaluation
evidence

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Indirect effects
  • Mediation
  • Methodology
  • Prevention
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Toxicology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Mackinnon, D., Taborga, M. P., & Morgan-Lopez, A. A. (2002). Mediation designs for tobacco prevention research. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 68(SUPPL.).

Mediation designs for tobacco prevention research. / Mackinnon, David; Taborga, Marcia P.; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 68, No. SUPPL., 01.11.2002.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mackinnon, D, Taborga, MP & Morgan-Lopez, AA 2002, 'Mediation designs for tobacco prevention research', Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 68, no. SUPPL..
Mackinnon, David ; Taborga, Marcia P. ; Morgan-Lopez, Antonio A. / Mediation designs for tobacco prevention research. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2002 ; Vol. 68, No. SUPPL.
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