Measuring material wealth in low-income settings

A conceptual and how-to guide

Bonnie N. Kaiser, Daniel Hruschka, Craig Hadley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although wealth is consistently found to be an important predictor of health and well-being, there remains debate as to the best way to conceptualize and operationalize wealth. In this article, we focus on the measurement of economic resources, which is one among many forms of wealth. We provide an overview of the process of measuring material wealth, including theoretical and conceptual considerations, a how-to guide based on the most common approach to measurement, and a review of important theoretical and empirical questions that remain to be resolved. Throughout, we emphasize considerations particular to the settings in which anthropologists work, and we include variations on common approaches to measuring material wealth that might be better suited to anthropologists' theoretical questions, methodological approaches, and fieldwork settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Biology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

income
low income
Economics
economic resources
Health
well-being
fieldwork
health
resources
economics
resource
measuring
material

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Anthropology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Measuring material wealth in low-income settings : A conceptual and how-to guide. / Kaiser, Bonnie N.; Hruschka, Daniel; Hadley, Craig.

In: American Journal of Human Biology, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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