Measuring changes in taxi trips near infill development and issues for curbside management of for-hire vehicles

David King, Juan Francisco Saldarriaga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This research examines changes in taxi trip origins and destinations after new multifamily residential buildings opened in New York City. We argue that taxi trips are a reasonable proxy for other for-hire vehicles trips, which are expected to grow in coming years. The analysis contributes to a more nuanced understanding of transportation effects of infill development. Infill developments are typically required to mitigate potential vehicular traffic increases, which are often ill suited to redevelopment of denser, more transit adjacent sites. This research uses geolocated trip data from New York City taxicabs combined with US Census, real estate pricing and tax lot data to develop a baseline understanding of the relationship between trip generation and infill residential development. The objective of this work is twofold. First, establish a measure of taxi activities based on neighborhood and building characteristics to help adapt transportation impact assessments for multimodal travel. Second, through observational data we discuss unique aspects of passenger pick-ups and drop offs as they relate to curb space and street use. Our results show that taxi trip making is positively associated with new residential construction, rental costs and places with high levels of transit usage, and adds demand to congested curb space. Curb space should be considered “wetlands” of urban systems, a poorly understood, yet key, component that connects the flows of traffic and activities in the built environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalResearch in Transportation Business and Management
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

taxis
Curbs
infill
Taxicabs
management
traffic
residential building
Pickups
redevelopment
Wetlands
wetland
real estate
Taxation
taxes
residential development
Costs
pricing
urban system
census
travel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Decision Sciences(all)
  • Business and International Management
  • Transportation
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance (miscellaneous)
  • Tourism, Leisure and Hospitality Management
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management Science and Operations Research

Cite this

@article{c701c2a6edcc499289b1ffcb90750c86,
title = "Measuring changes in taxi trips near infill development and issues for curbside management of for-hire vehicles",
abstract = "This research examines changes in taxi trip origins and destinations after new multifamily residential buildings opened in New York City. We argue that taxi trips are a reasonable proxy for other for-hire vehicles trips, which are expected to grow in coming years. The analysis contributes to a more nuanced understanding of transportation effects of infill development. Infill developments are typically required to mitigate potential vehicular traffic increases, which are often ill suited to redevelopment of denser, more transit adjacent sites. This research uses geolocated trip data from New York City taxicabs combined with US Census, real estate pricing and tax lot data to develop a baseline understanding of the relationship between trip generation and infill residential development. The objective of this work is twofold. First, establish a measure of taxi activities based on neighborhood and building characteristics to help adapt transportation impact assessments for multimodal travel. Second, through observational data we discuss unique aspects of passenger pick-ups and drop offs as they relate to curb space and street use. Our results show that taxi trip making is positively associated with new residential construction, rental costs and places with high levels of transit usage, and adds demand to congested curb space. Curb space should be considered “wetlands” of urban systems, a poorly understood, yet key, component that connects the flows of traffic and activities in the built environment.",
author = "David King and Saldarriaga, {Juan Francisco}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.rtbm.2018.10.006",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Research in Transportation Business and Management",
issn = "2210-5395",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measuring changes in taxi trips near infill development and issues for curbside management of for-hire vehicles

AU - King, David

AU - Saldarriaga, Juan Francisco

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - This research examines changes in taxi trip origins and destinations after new multifamily residential buildings opened in New York City. We argue that taxi trips are a reasonable proxy for other for-hire vehicles trips, which are expected to grow in coming years. The analysis contributes to a more nuanced understanding of transportation effects of infill development. Infill developments are typically required to mitigate potential vehicular traffic increases, which are often ill suited to redevelopment of denser, more transit adjacent sites. This research uses geolocated trip data from New York City taxicabs combined with US Census, real estate pricing and tax lot data to develop a baseline understanding of the relationship between trip generation and infill residential development. The objective of this work is twofold. First, establish a measure of taxi activities based on neighborhood and building characteristics to help adapt transportation impact assessments for multimodal travel. Second, through observational data we discuss unique aspects of passenger pick-ups and drop offs as they relate to curb space and street use. Our results show that taxi trip making is positively associated with new residential construction, rental costs and places with high levels of transit usage, and adds demand to congested curb space. Curb space should be considered “wetlands” of urban systems, a poorly understood, yet key, component that connects the flows of traffic and activities in the built environment.

AB - This research examines changes in taxi trip origins and destinations after new multifamily residential buildings opened in New York City. We argue that taxi trips are a reasonable proxy for other for-hire vehicles trips, which are expected to grow in coming years. The analysis contributes to a more nuanced understanding of transportation effects of infill development. Infill developments are typically required to mitigate potential vehicular traffic increases, which are often ill suited to redevelopment of denser, more transit adjacent sites. This research uses geolocated trip data from New York City taxicabs combined with US Census, real estate pricing and tax lot data to develop a baseline understanding of the relationship between trip generation and infill residential development. The objective of this work is twofold. First, establish a measure of taxi activities based on neighborhood and building characteristics to help adapt transportation impact assessments for multimodal travel. Second, through observational data we discuss unique aspects of passenger pick-ups and drop offs as they relate to curb space and street use. Our results show that taxi trip making is positively associated with new residential construction, rental costs and places with high levels of transit usage, and adds demand to congested curb space. Curb space should be considered “wetlands” of urban systems, a poorly understood, yet key, component that connects the flows of traffic and activities in the built environment.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85056590635&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85056590635&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.rtbm.2018.10.006

DO - 10.1016/j.rtbm.2018.10.006

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85056590635

JO - Research in Transportation Business and Management

JF - Research in Transportation Business and Management

SN - 2210-5395

ER -