Measures of recording stability in chronically implanted microwire arrays recorded for over three years

W. Lin, J. Schumacher, Stephen Helms Tillery, J. He

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The stability of the neural recording is a crucial issue for cortically controlled neuroprosthetic devices. Substantial effort is devoted to developing methods to improve the chronic neural recordings. Regardless of the approach one takes to improving recording stability, the core issue is to measure just how stable recording conditions really are. In the present study, microwire array electrodes were implanted into the motor cortex area of the rhesus monkey and neural signals were recorded for more than 3 years. The data acquired on each channel were then analyzed according to spike waveform, time course of task-related activity, and preferred direction. For the time span from the beginning to the end of the recording session, the monkey was trained to do three different tasks. Initial results indicate that a certain portion of channels produces very stable recordings for over three years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2005 First International Conference on Neural Interface and Control, Proceedings
Pages111-114
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event2005 First International Conference on Neural Interface and Control - Wuhan, China
Duration: May 26 2005May 28 2005

Publication series

Name2005 First International Conference on Neural Interface and Control, Proceedings

Other

Other2005 First International Conference on Neural Interface and Control
CountryChina
CityWuhan
Period5/26/055/28/05

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Keywords

  • Cortical control
  • Cortical implants
  • Multi-channel neural recording
  • Recording stability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Lin, W., Schumacher, J., Helms Tillery, S., & He, J. (2005). Measures of recording stability in chronically implanted microwire arrays recorded for over three years. In 2005 First International Conference on Neural Interface and Control, Proceedings (pp. 111-114). [1499855] (2005 First International Conference on Neural Interface and Control, Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1109/ICNIC.2005.1499855