Measurement of global self-concept versus multiple role-specific self-concepts in adolescents

N. Griffin, Laurie Chassin, R. D. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study tested a basic tenet of symbolic interactionist theory: namely that self-concept should be thought of as multiple and differentiated. One hundred high school students completed semantic differential ratings of themselves in four roles (student, athlete, son/daughter and best friend). A global self-rating ('Me') was also obtained. Discriminant function analyses and multivariate analyses of variance were used to compare sets of self-ratings. Significant differences were found between global self-ratings and role-specific self-ratings. Furthermore, self-ratings differed across different social roles. These results suggest that self-concept is better conceptualized as multiple and differentiated rather than as unitary and global.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-56
Number of pages8
JournalAdolescence
Volume16
Issue number61
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

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self-concept
Nuclear Family
Self Concept
rating
Semantic Differential
Students
adolescent
Discriminant Analysis
Athletes
Analysis of Variance
Multivariate Analysis
semantic differential
Social Role
athlete
student
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Measurement of global self-concept versus multiple role-specific self-concepts in adolescents. / Griffin, N.; Chassin, Laurie; Young, R. D.

In: Adolescence, Vol. 16, No. 61, 1981, p. 49-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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