Maternal feeding practices become more controlling after and not before excessive rates of weight gain

Kyung E. Rhee, Sharon M. Coleman, Danielle P. Appugliese, Niko A. Kaciroti, Robert F. Corwyn, Natalie S. Davidson, Robert Bradley, Julie C. Lumeng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is unclear whether controlling maternal feeding practices (CMFPs) lead to or are a response to increases in a child's BMI. Our goal was to determine the direction of this relationship. Data were obtained from National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Child BMI z-score (zBMI) was calculated from measured weight and height. CMFP was defined by, Do you let your child eat what he/she feels like eating. Change in child zBMI was calculated between 4-7 years and 7-9 years, and dichotomized into increasing vs. no change or decreasing. Change in CMFP was calculated over the same time periods, and dichotomized into more controlling vs. no change or less controlling. Multiple logistic regression, stratified by gender and controlling for race, maternal education, maternal weight status, and baseline child weight status, was used for analysis. A total of 789 children were included. From 4 to 9 years, mean zBMI increased (P = 0.02) and mothers became more controlling (P 0.001). Increasing CMFP between 4 and 7 years was associated with decreased odds of increasing zBMI between 7 and 9 years in boys (odds ratio = 0.52, 95% confidence interval = 0.27-1.00). There was no relationship in girls. Increasing zBMI between 4 and 7 years was associated with increasing CMFPs between 7 and 9 years in girls (odds ratio = 1.72, 95% confidence interval = 1.08-2.74), but not boys. Early increases in CMFP were not associated with later increases in zBMI for boys or girls. However, early increases in zBMI among girls were associated with later increases in CMFP. Clarifying the relationship between maternal feeding practices and child weight will inform future recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1724-1729
Number of pages6
JournalObesity
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Weight Gain
Mothers
Weights and Measures
Odds Ratio
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (U.S.)
Confidence Intervals
Child Care
Eating
Logistic Models
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Rhee, K. E., Coleman, S. M., Appugliese, D. P., Kaciroti, N. A., Corwyn, R. F., Davidson, N. S., ... Lumeng, J. C. (2009). Maternal feeding practices become more controlling after and not before excessive rates of weight gain. Obesity, 17(9), 1724-1729. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2009.54

Maternal feeding practices become more controlling after and not before excessive rates of weight gain. / Rhee, Kyung E.; Coleman, Sharon M.; Appugliese, Danielle P.; Kaciroti, Niko A.; Corwyn, Robert F.; Davidson, Natalie S.; Bradley, Robert; Lumeng, Julie C.

In: Obesity, Vol. 17, No. 9, 09.2009, p. 1724-1729.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rhee, KE, Coleman, SM, Appugliese, DP, Kaciroti, NA, Corwyn, RF, Davidson, NS, Bradley, R & Lumeng, JC 2009, 'Maternal feeding practices become more controlling after and not before excessive rates of weight gain', Obesity, vol. 17, no. 9, pp. 1724-1729. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2009.54
Rhee KE, Coleman SM, Appugliese DP, Kaciroti NA, Corwyn RF, Davidson NS et al. Maternal feeding practices become more controlling after and not before excessive rates of weight gain. Obesity. 2009 Sep;17(9):1724-1729. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2009.54
Rhee, Kyung E. ; Coleman, Sharon M. ; Appugliese, Danielle P. ; Kaciroti, Niko A. ; Corwyn, Robert F. ; Davidson, Natalie S. ; Bradley, Robert ; Lumeng, Julie C. / Maternal feeding practices become more controlling after and not before excessive rates of weight gain. In: Obesity. 2009 ; Vol. 17, No. 9. pp. 1724-1729.
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