Mass Reentry, Neighborhood Context and Recidivism: Examining How the Distribution of Parolees Within and Across Neighborhoods Impacts Recidivism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent scholarship focuses on the role neighborhood context plays in reoffending. These studies lack an examination of how the size of the parolee population at the neighborhood-level impacts individual recidivism. We examine how the size and clustering of parolee populations within and across neighborhoods impacts individual-level recidivism. Using data from parolees returning to three Ohio cities from 2000 to 2009, we examine how concentrations of parolees in neighborhoods and in the surrounding neighborhoods impact the likelihood of reoffending. We also examine whether parolee clustering conditions the relationship between neighborhood-level characteristics and recidivism. Results show concentrated reentry increases recidivism, while parolees in stable neighborhoods are less likely to recidivate. Also, the positive effect of parolee concentration is tempered when parolees return to stable neighborhoods. These findings suggest that augmenting resources available in neighborhoods saturated by parolees, as well as bolstering residential stability in these same neighborhoods might reduce reoffending.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)912-941
Number of pages30
JournalJustice Quarterly
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 28 2016

Keywords

  • mass incarceration
  • neighborhoods
  • parolees
  • recidivism
  • reentry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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