Mars' "White Rock" feature lacks evidence of an aqueous origin: Results from Mars Global Surveyor

Steven Ruff, Philip Christensen, Roger N. Clark, Hugh H. Kieffer, Michael C. Malin, Joshua L. Bandfield, Bruce M. Jakosky, Melissa D. Lane, Michael T. Mellon, Marsha A. Presley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The "White Rock" feature on Mars has long been viewed as a type example for a Martian playa largely because of its apparent high albedo along with its location in a topographic basin (a crater). Data from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) demonstrate that White Rock is not anomalously bright relative to other Martian bright regions, reducing the significance of its albedo and weakening the analogy to terrestrial playas. Its thermal inertia value indicates that it is not mantled by a layer of loose dust, nor is it bedrock. The thermal infrared spectrum of White Rock shows no obvious features of carbonates or sulfates and is, in fact, spectrally flat. Images from the Mars Orbiter Camera show that the White Rock massifs are consolidated enough to retain slopes and allow the passage of saltating grains over their surfaces. Material appears to be shed from the massifs and is concentrated at the crests of nearby bedforms. One explanation for these observations is that White Rock is an eroded accumulation of compacted or weakly cemented aeolian sediment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23921-23927
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research E: Planets
Volume106
Issue numberE10
StatePublished - Oct 25 2001

Fingerprint

Mars Global Surveyor
mars
Mars
Rocks
rocks
playas
massifs
rock
playa
albedo
Carbonates
bedrock
bedform
thermal emission
craters
inertia
Sulfates
crater
Dust
Spectrometers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Ruff, S., Christensen, P., Clark, R. N., Kieffer, H. H., Malin, M. C., Bandfield, J. L., ... Presley, M. A. (2001). Mars' "White Rock" feature lacks evidence of an aqueous origin: Results from Mars Global Surveyor. Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, 106(E10), 23921-23927.

Mars' "White Rock" feature lacks evidence of an aqueous origin : Results from Mars Global Surveyor. / Ruff, Steven; Christensen, Philip; Clark, Roger N.; Kieffer, Hugh H.; Malin, Michael C.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Lane, Melissa D.; Mellon, Michael T.; Presley, Marsha A.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, Vol. 106, No. E10, 25.10.2001, p. 23921-23927.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ruff, S, Christensen, P, Clark, RN, Kieffer, HH, Malin, MC, Bandfield, JL, Jakosky, BM, Lane, MD, Mellon, MT & Presley, MA 2001, 'Mars' "White Rock" feature lacks evidence of an aqueous origin: Results from Mars Global Surveyor', Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets, vol. 106, no. E10, pp. 23921-23927.
Ruff, Steven ; Christensen, Philip ; Clark, Roger N. ; Kieffer, Hugh H. ; Malin, Michael C. ; Bandfield, Joshua L. ; Jakosky, Bruce M. ; Lane, Melissa D. ; Mellon, Michael T. ; Presley, Marsha A. / Mars' "White Rock" feature lacks evidence of an aqueous origin : Results from Mars Global Surveyor. In: Journal of Geophysical Research E: Planets. 2001 ; Vol. 106, No. E10. pp. 23921-23927.
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