Marital violence, co-parenting, and family-level processes in relation to children's adjustment

Lynn Fainsilber Katz, Sabina M. Low

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

A multimethod approach was used to examine relations between marital violence, co-parenting, and family-level processes and children's adjustment in a community-based sample of marital violence. Two hypotheses were tested, one in which family-level and co-parenting processes mediate relations between marital violence and child functioning and one in which marital violence and family-level/co-parenting processes function relatively independently in influencing children's adjustment. Observations of family processes were made within a triadic parent-child interaction, and several dimensions of children's socio-emotional adjustment (i.e., peer relations, behavior problems) were examined. Results indicated that hostile-withdrawn co-parenting mediated the relations between marital violence and children's anxiety and depression. Marital violence, co-parenting, and family-level processes also functioned independently in predicting child outcome. Findings are discussed in terms of the family dynamics present in maritally violent homes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-382
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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