Mapping U.S. government tobacco control leadership

networked for success?

Scott Leischow, Douglas A. Luke, Nancy Mueller, Jenine K. Harris, Paris Ponder, Stephen Marcus, Pamela I. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to better understand how tobacco control efforts are coordinated across agencies of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), we assessed tobacco control-related communication between tobacco control leaders across DHHS. Cross-sectional surveys were collected from individuals representing 11 DHHS agencies, and social network analyses were used to assess linkages and map agencies' tobacco control communication. Individuals within the Office of the Secretary and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were most central to the network, and those of highest rank were most likely to be central to the network (F = 4.03, p = .024). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Food and Drug Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration had no or almost no contact with other agencies. There was considerable between-agency contact variability, and the CDC was the most central agency. Tobacco control communication across DHHS agencies was present but extremely variable. This inconsistency may compromise the ability of the DHHS to address tobacco use, a critical public health problem, in a coordinated and efficient fashion. In light of the new leadership at DHHS, this analysis describes a systems approach that can be reimplemented as a means of understanding and improving communication and collaboration to improve public health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)888-894
Number of pages7
JournalNicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Volume12
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

United States Dept. of Health and Human Services
Tobacco
Communication
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Health Services Misuse
United States Health Resources and Services Administration
Health Services Administration
Public Health
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.)
Aptitude
Mental Health Services
Tobacco Use
United States Food and Drug Administration
Systems Analysis
Social Support
Substance-Related Disorders
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Mapping U.S. government tobacco control leadership : networked for success? / Leischow, Scott; Luke, Douglas A.; Mueller, Nancy; Harris, Jenine K.; Ponder, Paris; Marcus, Stephen; Clark, Pamela I.

In: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, Vol. 12, No. 9, 01.01.2010, p. 888-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leischow, Scott ; Luke, Douglas A. ; Mueller, Nancy ; Harris, Jenine K. ; Ponder, Paris ; Marcus, Stephen ; Clark, Pamela I. / Mapping U.S. government tobacco control leadership : networked for success?. In: Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. 2010 ; Vol. 12, No. 9. pp. 888-894.
@article{6064eb1949f54208b99506bc568759cb,
title = "Mapping U.S. government tobacco control leadership: networked for success?",
abstract = "In order to better understand how tobacco control efforts are coordinated across agencies of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), we assessed tobacco control-related communication between tobacco control leaders across DHHS. Cross-sectional surveys were collected from individuals representing 11 DHHS agencies, and social network analyses were used to assess linkages and map agencies' tobacco control communication. Individuals within the Office of the Secretary and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were most central to the network, and those of highest rank were most likely to be central to the network (F = 4.03, p = .024). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Food and Drug Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration had no or almost no contact with other agencies. There was considerable between-agency contact variability, and the CDC was the most central agency. Tobacco control communication across DHHS agencies was present but extremely variable. This inconsistency may compromise the ability of the DHHS to address tobacco use, a critical public health problem, in a coordinated and efficient fashion. In light of the new leadership at DHHS, this analysis describes a systems approach that can be reimplemented as a means of understanding and improving communication and collaboration to improve public health.",
author = "Scott Leischow and Luke, {Douglas A.} and Nancy Mueller and Harris, {Jenine K.} and Paris Ponder and Stephen Marcus and Clark, {Pamela I.}",
year = "2010",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/ntr/ntq112",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "888--894",
journal = "Nicotine and Tobacco Research",
issn = "1462-2203",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mapping U.S. government tobacco control leadership

T2 - networked for success?

AU - Leischow, Scott

AU - Luke, Douglas A.

AU - Mueller, Nancy

AU - Harris, Jenine K.

AU - Ponder, Paris

AU - Marcus, Stephen

AU - Clark, Pamela I.

PY - 2010/1/1

Y1 - 2010/1/1

N2 - In order to better understand how tobacco control efforts are coordinated across agencies of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), we assessed tobacco control-related communication between tobacco control leaders across DHHS. Cross-sectional surveys were collected from individuals representing 11 DHHS agencies, and social network analyses were used to assess linkages and map agencies' tobacco control communication. Individuals within the Office of the Secretary and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were most central to the network, and those of highest rank were most likely to be central to the network (F = 4.03, p = .024). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Food and Drug Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration had no or almost no contact with other agencies. There was considerable between-agency contact variability, and the CDC was the most central agency. Tobacco control communication across DHHS agencies was present but extremely variable. This inconsistency may compromise the ability of the DHHS to address tobacco use, a critical public health problem, in a coordinated and efficient fashion. In light of the new leadership at DHHS, this analysis describes a systems approach that can be reimplemented as a means of understanding and improving communication and collaboration to improve public health.

AB - In order to better understand how tobacco control efforts are coordinated across agencies of the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), we assessed tobacco control-related communication between tobacco control leaders across DHHS. Cross-sectional surveys were collected from individuals representing 11 DHHS agencies, and social network analyses were used to assess linkages and map agencies' tobacco control communication. Individuals within the Office of the Secretary and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were most central to the network, and those of highest rank were most likely to be central to the network (F = 4.03, p = .024). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Food and Drug Administration, Health Resources and Services Administration, and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration had no or almost no contact with other agencies. There was considerable between-agency contact variability, and the CDC was the most central agency. Tobacco control communication across DHHS agencies was present but extremely variable. This inconsistency may compromise the ability of the DHHS to address tobacco use, a critical public health problem, in a coordinated and efficient fashion. In light of the new leadership at DHHS, this analysis describes a systems approach that can be reimplemented as a means of understanding and improving communication and collaboration to improve public health.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952109772&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952109772&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/ntr/ntq112

DO - 10.1093/ntr/ntq112

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 888

EP - 894

JO - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

JF - Nicotine and Tobacco Research

SN - 1462-2203

IS - 9

ER -