Mapping the distribution of vesicular textures on silicic lavas using the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner

J. Ondrusek, Philip Christensen, J. H. Fink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) is a potentially powerful tool for mapping detailed chemical variations in silicic lava flows which in turn could expand knowledge of pre-eruption compositional gradients and mixing processes in silicic magma bodies. However, thermal infrared image data may be greatly influenced by the range of vesicular textures which occur on silicic flows. To investigate the effect of vesicularity on TIMS imagery independent of chemical variations, Little Glass Mountain at the Medicine Lake Volcano of northern California, a large rhyolitic flow of uniform composition but textural heterogeneity was studied. The imagery was recalibrated so that the digital number values for a lake in the scene matched a calculated ideal spectrum for water. TIMS spectra for the lava show useful differences in coarsely and finely vesicular pumice data, particularly in TIMS bands 3 and 4. Images generated by ratioing these bands accurately map out those areas known from field studies to be coarsely vesicular pumice. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15,903-15,908
JournalJournal of geophysical research
Volume98
Issue numberB9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

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