Abstract

A common external effect of aquaculture is the transmission of infectious diseases to wild fish stocks. A frequently cited example of this is the infection of wild salmon by sea lice from salmon farms. Management of the disease risk to wild salmon populations requires an understanding both of the disease transmission mechanisms and the control incentives faced by fish farmers. In this paper we develop a bioeconomic model that integrates sea lice population dynamics, fish population dynamics, aquaculture, and wild capture salmon fisheries. Using an optimal control framework, we investigate options for managing the sea lice infection externality. We pay particular attention to the role of sea lice management on the stability of wild stocks, and the sensitivity of sea lice effects on wild fisheries. We find that the stability of wild stocks is related to sea-lice-induced mortality (inversely) and the value of wild fishery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)228-237
Number of pages10
JournalEcological Economics
Volume142
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

louse
aquaculture
fishery
population dynamics
disease transmission
infectious disease
fish
wild population
sea
Aquaculture
Fisheries
Salmon
incentive
farm
Fish
mortality
Population dynamics
Infection

Keywords

  • Binary control
  • Externality
  • Infectious wildlife disease
  • Marine salmon aquaculture
  • Sea lice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Managing the Risks of Sea Lice Transmission Between Salmon Aquaculture and Wild Pink Salmon Fishery. / Huang, Biao; Perrings, Charles.

In: Ecological Economics, Vol. 142, 01.12.2017, p. 228-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ef4809b2310c4b8db2cf45f570e29767,
title = "Managing the Risks of Sea Lice Transmission Between Salmon Aquaculture and Wild Pink Salmon Fishery",
abstract = "A common external effect of aquaculture is the transmission of infectious diseases to wild fish stocks. A frequently cited example of this is the infection of wild salmon by sea lice from salmon farms. Management of the disease risk to wild salmon populations requires an understanding both of the disease transmission mechanisms and the control incentives faced by fish farmers. In this paper we develop a bioeconomic model that integrates sea lice population dynamics, fish population dynamics, aquaculture, and wild capture salmon fisheries. Using an optimal control framework, we investigate options for managing the sea lice infection externality. We pay particular attention to the role of sea lice management on the stability of wild stocks, and the sensitivity of sea lice effects on wild fisheries. We find that the stability of wild stocks is related to sea-lice-induced mortality (inversely) and the value of wild fishery.",
keywords = "Binary control, Externality, Infectious wildlife disease, Marine salmon aquaculture, Sea lice",
author = "Biao Huang and Charles Perrings",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.03.012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "142",
pages = "228--237",
journal = "Ecological Economics",
issn = "0921-8009",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Managing the Risks of Sea Lice Transmission Between Salmon Aquaculture and Wild Pink Salmon Fishery

AU - Huang, Biao

AU - Perrings, Charles

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - A common external effect of aquaculture is the transmission of infectious diseases to wild fish stocks. A frequently cited example of this is the infection of wild salmon by sea lice from salmon farms. Management of the disease risk to wild salmon populations requires an understanding both of the disease transmission mechanisms and the control incentives faced by fish farmers. In this paper we develop a bioeconomic model that integrates sea lice population dynamics, fish population dynamics, aquaculture, and wild capture salmon fisheries. Using an optimal control framework, we investigate options for managing the sea lice infection externality. We pay particular attention to the role of sea lice management on the stability of wild stocks, and the sensitivity of sea lice effects on wild fisheries. We find that the stability of wild stocks is related to sea-lice-induced mortality (inversely) and the value of wild fishery.

AB - A common external effect of aquaculture is the transmission of infectious diseases to wild fish stocks. A frequently cited example of this is the infection of wild salmon by sea lice from salmon farms. Management of the disease risk to wild salmon populations requires an understanding both of the disease transmission mechanisms and the control incentives faced by fish farmers. In this paper we develop a bioeconomic model that integrates sea lice population dynamics, fish population dynamics, aquaculture, and wild capture salmon fisheries. Using an optimal control framework, we investigate options for managing the sea lice infection externality. We pay particular attention to the role of sea lice management on the stability of wild stocks, and the sensitivity of sea lice effects on wild fisheries. We find that the stability of wild stocks is related to sea-lice-induced mortality (inversely) and the value of wild fishery.

KW - Binary control

KW - Externality

KW - Infectious wildlife disease

KW - Marine salmon aquaculture

KW - Sea lice

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030469897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030469897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.03.012

DO - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.03.012

M3 - Article

VL - 142

SP - 228

EP - 237

JO - Ecological Economics

JF - Ecological Economics

SN - 0921-8009

ER -