Managing hydrological infrastructure assets for improved flood control in coastal mega-cities of developing nations

R. I. Ogie, P. Perez, K. T. Win, K. Michael

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Every year, coastal mega-cities situated in developing nations suffer severe losses associated with flood hazards. In response to this problem, these cities often rely on engineering interventions or structural measures, which typically necessitate an informed management of hydrological infrastructure assets such as waterways or drainage channels, detention reservoirs, high-protection levees, seawalls, dikes, dams, pumping stations and floodgates. Unfortunately, flood management outcomes, based on the use of these hydrological infrastructure assets, are undermined by lack of data and resources to support decision makers. The aim of this study is to provide strategic action plans to address this problem. First, the study reviews literature on flood-related issues and interventions in several coastal mega-cities situated in developing nations. Then, outputs of the review are synthesized into threats, opportunities, weaknesses and strengths common to these cities in relation to infrastructure-based approach to flood management. Using this information, situational analysis is carried out and appropriate strategies are recommended to help support informed management of hydrological infrastructure assets as means of improving flood control in coastal mega-cities situated in developing nations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)763-777
Number of pages15
JournalUrban Climate
Volume24
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coastal
  • Developing nations
  • Flood control
  • Hydrological infrastructure
  • Mega-cities
  • TOWS analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Environmental Science (miscellaneous)
  • Urban Studies
  • Atmospheric Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Managing hydrological infrastructure assets for improved flood control in coastal mega-cities of developing nations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this