Managing conflict appropriately and effectively: An application of the competence model to rahim's organizational conflict styles

Michael A. Gross, Laura Guerrero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Scopus citations

Abstract

The competence model of conflict communication suggests that individuals who use various conflict styles will be perceived differently in terms of appropriateness and effectiveness. A simulated organizational decision-making task involving 100 randomly-paired dyads consisting of business students suggested that an integrative conflict style is generally perceived as the most appropriate (in terms of being both a polite, prosocial strategy and an adaptive, situationally appropriate strategy) and most effective style. The dominating style tended to be perceived as inappropriate when used by others, but some participants judged themselves as more effective when they used dominating tactics along with integrating tactics. The obliging style was generally per-ceived as neutral, although some participants perceived themselves to be less effective and relationally appropriate when they employed obliging tactics. The avoiding style was generally perceived as ineffective and inappropriate. Finally, compromising was perceived as a relatively neutral style, although some participants judged their partners to be more effective and relationally appropriate if they compromised. Overall, these results and others provide general support for the competence model's predictions, while also suggesting some modifications and directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-226
Number of pages27
JournalInternational Journal of Conflict Management
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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