Male mate-locating behavior in Euphydryas chalcedona (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) related to pupation site preferences

Ronald L. Rutowski, George W. Gilchrist, Barbara Terkanian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Males of the checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas chalcedona)patrol and perch near but not on the larval foodplant in search of females. Experiments with tethered butterflies show that searching males chase virgin females for longer times than they do mated females or males. The larvae leave the larval food-plant to pupate. The correspondence between the distance from the larval foodplant to pupation sites and where males search for females suggests that male mate-locating behavior has evolved to maximize the rate of encounters with newly emerged, virgin females. These conclusions are compared to a recent analysis of butterfly mating systems by Odendaal et al. (Am. Nat.125: 673-678, 1985).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)277-289
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Insect Behavior
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1988

Keywords

  • Euphydryas chalcedona
  • Lepidoptera
  • butterfly
  • mate-locating behavior
  • pupation sites
  • sexual discrimination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Insect Science

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