MALDI TOF MS profiling of bacteria at the strain level

A review

Todd Sandrin, Jason E. Goldstein, Stephanie Schumaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

166 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since the advent of the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) as a tool for microbial characterization, efforts to increase the taxonomic resolution of the approach have been made. The rapidity and efficacy of the approach have suggested applications in counter-bioterrorism, prevention of food contamination, and monitoring the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Strain-level resolution has been reported with diverse bacteria, using library-based and bioinformatics-enabled approaches. Three types of characterization at the strain level have been reported: strain categorization, strain differentiation, and strain identification. Efforts to enhance the library-based approach have involved sample pre-treatment and data reduction strategies. Bioinformatics approaches have leveraged the ever-increasing amount of publicly available genomic and proteomic data to attain strain-level characterization. Bioinformatics-enabled strategies have facilitated strain characterization via intact biomarker identification, bottom-up, and top-down approaches. Rigorous quantitative and advanced statistical analyses have fostered success at the strain level with both approaches. Library-based approaches can be limited by effects of sample preparation and culture conditions on reproducibility, whereas bioinformatics-enabled approaches are typically limited to bacteria, for which genetic and/or proteomic data are available. Biological molecules other than proteins produced in strain-specific manners, including lipids and lipopeptides, might represent other avenues by which strain-level resolution might be attained. Immunological and lectin-based chemistries have shown promise to enhance sensitivity and specificity. Whereas the limits of the taxonomic resolution of MALDI TOF MS profiling of bacteria appears bacterium-specific, recent data suggest that these limits might not yet have been reached.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)188-217
Number of pages30
JournalMass Spectrometry Reviews
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

bacteria
Ionization
Mass spectrometry
Desorption
Mass Spectrometry
Bacteria
Computational Biology
Lasers
mass spectroscopy
desorption
ionization
Libraries
matrices
lasers
Bioinformatics
Proteomics
Food Contamination
Lipopeptides
Bioterrorism
antibiotics

Keywords

  • bacteria
  • fingerprinting
  • MALDI TOF MS
  • profiling
  • strain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

MALDI TOF MS profiling of bacteria at the strain level : A review. / Sandrin, Todd; Goldstein, Jason E.; Schumaker, Stephanie.

In: Mass Spectrometry Reviews, Vol. 32, No. 3, 05.2013, p. 188-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sandrin, Todd ; Goldstein, Jason E. ; Schumaker, Stephanie. / MALDI TOF MS profiling of bacteria at the strain level : A review. In: Mass Spectrometry Reviews. 2013 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 188-217.
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