Making connections for themselves and their students: Examining teachers organization of world history

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The ability to make connections is an important aspect of teaching history and a vital skill in our increasingly globalized world. This study examines how preservice and practicing teachers organize and connect world historical events and concepts for themselves and for instructional purposes. Findings are based on interviews with 2 card-sorting and think-aloud tasks. Analysis of card-sort maps found that participants made different kinds of connections that give insight into the types of knowledge needed for and the challenges involved with teaching world history. Participants were able to represent the most sophisticated historical processes when they discussed how to connect events to other events. All of the participants made fewer event-to-event connections in the second card-sort focused on instruction, and all but 1 changed the organizational scheme of the cards. This second finding indicates a shift in how participants represented their thinking of world history for themselves and how they might represent it for their students.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-374
Number of pages39
JournalTheory and Research in Social Education
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2014

Keywords

  • global education
  • history teaching
  • preservice teacher education
  • teacher knowledge
  • world history

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

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