Maintaining and restoring privacy through communication in different types of relationships

Judee K. Burgoon, Roxanne Parrott, Beth A. Le Poire, Douglas Kelley, Joseph B. Walther, Denise Perry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This investigation analysed the kinds of communicative acts that are considered privacy-invading, which communication strategies are used to restore privacy when it has been violated and how relationship type affects communication of privacy. A preliminary self-report survey and a pilot study employing open-ended interviews (n=43) led to the development of a questionnaire in which respondents (n=444) rated 39 possible actions on invasiveness and rated the likelihood of using 40 different tactics to restore privacy. Types of privacy violations formed five dimensions: (1) psychological and informational violations, (2) non-verbal interactional violations, (3) verbal interactional violations, (4) physical violations and (5) impersonal violations. Strategies used to restore privacy included: (1) interaction control, (2) dyadic intimacy, (3) negative arousal, (4) distancing, (5) blocking and (6) confrontation. Significant differences emerged across doctor-patient, employeremployee, teacher-student, parent-child, spouse-spouse and siblingsibling relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-158
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Privacy
privacy
Communication
communication
Students
Spouses
spouse
intimacy
Arousal
tactics
Self Report
student teacher
parents
Interviews
Psychology
questionnaire
interaction
interview
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Maintaining and restoring privacy through communication in different types of relationships. / Burgoon, Judee K.; Parrott, Roxanne; Le Poire, Beth A.; Kelley, Douglas; Walther, Joseph B.; Perry, Denise.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 6, No. 2, 1989, p. 131-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burgoon, Judee K. ; Parrott, Roxanne ; Le Poire, Beth A. ; Kelley, Douglas ; Walther, Joseph B. ; Perry, Denise. / Maintaining and restoring privacy through communication in different types of relationships. In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 1989 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 131-158.
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