Mably and Berne

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The Swiss Cantons had no greater admirer in the eighteenth-century than the French political thinker Gabriel Bonnot de Mably. The feeling was mutual, at least to some extent, since the Bernese Patriotic Society awarded its first prize in 1763 to Mably, for his dialogue Entretiens de Phocion. The prize then led to an exchange of letters, stretching across some two decades, with Daniel Fellenberg, founder of the Patriotic society-the most important block of Mably's correspondence to have survived. This essay considers the 1763 prize and the correspondence with Fellenberg for the light they cast both on Mably and on Bernese participation in the wider currents of eighteenth-century thought.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)427-439
    Number of pages13
    JournalHistory of European Ideas
    Volume33
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 2007

    Fingerprint

    eighteenth century
    canton
    Swiss
    dialogue
    participation
    Society
    Berne
    Participation
    Thinkers
    Thought
    Letters

    Keywords

    • Berne
    • Corruption
    • Fellenberg
    • Mably
    • Republicanism
    • Rousseau
    • Virtue

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • History
    • Sociology and Political Science

    Cite this

    Mably and Berne. / Wright, Johnson.

    In: History of European Ideas, Vol. 33, No. 4, 12.2007, p. 427-439.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Wright, Johnson. / Mably and Berne. In: History of European Ideas. 2007 ; Vol. 33, No. 4. pp. 427-439.
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