Lower Fasted-State but Greater Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Response to Elevated Plasma Amino Acids in Obesity

Lee Tran, Katon A. Kras, Nyssa Hoffman, Jayachandran Ravichandran, Jared Dickinson, Andrew D'Lugos, Chad C. Carroll, Shivam H. Patel, Lawrence J. Mandarino, Lori Roust, Christos Katsanos

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: Obesity alters protein metabolism in skeletal muscle, but consistent evidence is lacking. This study compared muscle protein synthesis in adults with obesity and in lean controls in the fasted state and during an amino acid infusion. Methods: Ten subjects with obesity (age: 36 ± 3 years; BMI: 34 ± 1 kg/m2) and ten controls (age: 35 ± 3 years; BMI: 23 ± 1 kg/m2) received an infusion of L-[2,3,3,4,5,5,5,6,6,6-2H10]leucine (0.15 μmol/kg fat-free mass/min) to measure muscle protein synthesis after an overnight fast and during amino acid infusion. Results: Despite greater muscle mammalian target of rapamycin phosphorylation (P ≤ 0.05), fasted-state mixed-muscle and mitochondrial protein synthesis were lower in subjects with obesity (P ≤ 0.05). However, the change in mixed-muscle protein synthesis during the amino acid infusion was 2.7-fold greater in subjects with obesity (P ≤ 0.05), accompanied by a greater change in S6 kinase-1 phosphorylation (P ≤ 0.05). The change in mitochondrial protein synthesis did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Adults with obesity have reduced muscle protein synthesis in the fasted state, but this response is compensated for by a greater change in overall muscle protein synthesis during amino acid infusion.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1179-1187
    Number of pages9
    JournalObesity
    Volume26
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jul 1 2018

    Fingerprint

    Muscle Proteins
    Obesity
    Amino Acids
    Mitochondrial Proteins
    Phosphorylation
    Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases
    Sirolimus
    Leucine
    Skeletal Muscle
    Fats
    Muscles
    Proteins

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine (miscellaneous)
    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
    • Endocrinology
    • Nutrition and Dietetics

    Cite this

    Lower Fasted-State but Greater Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Response to Elevated Plasma Amino Acids in Obesity. / Tran, Lee; Kras, Katon A.; Hoffman, Nyssa; Ravichandran, Jayachandran; Dickinson, Jared; D'Lugos, Andrew; Carroll, Chad C.; Patel, Shivam H.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Roust, Lori; Katsanos, Christos.

    In: Obesity, Vol. 26, No. 7, 01.07.2018, p. 1179-1187.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Tran, L, Kras, KA, Hoffman, N, Ravichandran, J, Dickinson, J, D'Lugos, A, Carroll, CC, Patel, SH, Mandarino, LJ, Roust, L & Katsanos, C 2018, 'Lower Fasted-State but Greater Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Response to Elevated Plasma Amino Acids in Obesity', Obesity, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 1179-1187. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22213
    Tran, Lee ; Kras, Katon A. ; Hoffman, Nyssa ; Ravichandran, Jayachandran ; Dickinson, Jared ; D'Lugos, Andrew ; Carroll, Chad C. ; Patel, Shivam H. ; Mandarino, Lawrence J. ; Roust, Lori ; Katsanos, Christos. / Lower Fasted-State but Greater Increase in Muscle Protein Synthesis in Response to Elevated Plasma Amino Acids in Obesity. In: Obesity. 2018 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 1179-1187.
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    abstract = "Objective: Obesity alters protein metabolism in skeletal muscle, but consistent evidence is lacking. This study compared muscle protein synthesis in adults with obesity and in lean controls in the fasted state and during an amino acid infusion. Methods: Ten subjects with obesity (age: 36 ± 3 years; BMI: 34 ± 1 kg/m2) and ten controls (age: 35 ± 3 years; BMI: 23 ± 1 kg/m2) received an infusion of L-[2,3,3,4,5,5,5,6,6,6-2H10]leucine (0.15 μmol/kg fat-free mass/min) to measure muscle protein synthesis after an overnight fast and during amino acid infusion. Results: Despite greater muscle mammalian target of rapamycin phosphorylation (P ≤ 0.05), fasted-state mixed-muscle and mitochondrial protein synthesis were lower in subjects with obesity (P ≤ 0.05). However, the change in mixed-muscle protein synthesis during the amino acid infusion was 2.7-fold greater in subjects with obesity (P ≤ 0.05), accompanied by a greater change in S6 kinase-1 phosphorylation (P ≤ 0.05). The change in mitochondrial protein synthesis did not differ between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Adults with obesity have reduced muscle protein synthesis in the fasted state, but this response is compensated for by a greater change in overall muscle protein synthesis during amino acid infusion.",
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    AU - Ravichandran, Jayachandran

    AU - Dickinson, Jared

    AU - D'Lugos, Andrew

    AU - Carroll, Chad C.

    AU - Patel, Shivam H.

    AU - Mandarino, Lawrence J.

    AU - Roust, Lori

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