Low self-control, routine activities, and fraud victimization

Kristy Holtfreter, Michael D. Reisig, Travis C. Pratt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

171 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent research has used both routine activity/lifestyle frameworks and self-control theory to explain victimization. Thus far, combined tests of these theories have focused on offending populations and street crime victimization. Whether these frameworks also explain exposure to and likelihood of nonviolent victimization (e.g., fraud) in general-population samples remains an open empirical question. Building on prior work, we assess the independent effects of routine consumer activities (i.e., remote purchasing) and low self-control on the likelihood of fraud targeting and victimization. Using a representative sample of 922 adults from a statewide survey in Florida, the results confirm our expectation that remote-purchasing activities increase consumers' risk of being targeted for fraud. Low self-control has no effect on whether consumers are targeted, but it does significantly increase the likelihood of fraud victimization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-220
Number of pages32
JournalCriminology
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

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Keywords

  • Fraud
  • Remote purchasing
  • Routine activities
  • Self-control
  • Victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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