Longitudinal Relations Among Parenting Styles, Prosocial Behaviors, and Academic Outcomes in U.S. Mexican Adolescents

Gustavo Carlo, Rebecca White, Cara Streit, George P. Knight, Katharine H. Zeiders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examined parenting styles and prosocial behaviors as longitudinal predictors of academic outcomes in U.S. Mexican youth. Adolescents (N = 462; Wave 1 Mage = 10.4 years; 48.1% girls), parents, and teachers completed parenting, prosocial behavior, and academic outcome measures at 5th, 10th, and 12th grades. Authoritative parents were more likely to have youth who exhibited high levels of prosocial behaviors than those who were moderately demanding and less involved. Fathers and mothers who were less involved and mothers who were moderately demanding were less likely than authoritative parents to have youth who exhibited high levels of prosocial behaviors. Prosocial behaviors were positively associated with academic outcomes. Discussion focuses on parenting, prosocial behaviors, and academic attitudes in understanding youth academic performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChild Development
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

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parenting style
Parenting
adolescent
parents
Parents
Mothers
Fathers
father
school grade
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
teacher
performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Longitudinal Relations Among Parenting Styles, Prosocial Behaviors, and Academic Outcomes in U.S. Mexican Adolescents. / Carlo, Gustavo; White, Rebecca; Streit, Cara; Knight, George P.; Zeiders, Katharine H.

In: Child Development, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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