Longitudinal predictors of school-age academic achievement: Unique contributions of toddler-age aggression, oppositionality, inattention, and hyperactivity

Lauretta M. Brennan, Daniel S. Shaw, Thomas J. Dishion, Melvin Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

This project examined the unique predictive validity of parent ratings of toddler-age aggression, oppositionality, inattention, and hyperactivity- impulsivity to academic achievement at school-age in a sample of 566 high-risk children and families. The study also investigated potential indirect effects of the Family Check-Up on school-age academic achievement through changes in child behavior problems. The results demonstrated that toddler-age aggression was most consistently associated with school-age academic achievement, albeit modestly. Moreover, findings showed that the intervention predicted greater decreases in aggression from ages 2-3 to 4-5 compared to controls. The results suggest that in high-risk toddler-aged children, aggression may be a more consistent predictor of school-age academic achievement than other externalizing dimensions, which has implications for early identification and efforts to promote children's adaptation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1289-1300
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume40
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

Keywords

  • Developmental psychopathology
  • Disruptive behavior
  • Intervention
  • Parenting
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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