Long-term outcomes from a multiple-risk-factor diabetes trial for Latinas

¡Viva Bien!

Deborah J. Toobert, Lisa A. Strycker, Diane K. King, Manuel Barrera, Diego Osuna, Russell E. Glasgow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Latinas with type 2 diabetes are in need of culturally sensitive interventions to make recommended long-term lifestyle changes and reduce heart disease risk. To test the longer-term (24-month) effects of a previously successful, culturally adapted, multiple-health-behavior-change program, ¡Viva Bien!, 280 Latinas were randomly assigned to usual care or ¡Viva Bien!. Treatment included group meetings to promote a culturally adapted Mediterranean diet, physical activity, supportive resources, problem solving, stress-management practices, and smoking cessation. ¡Viva Bien! participants achieved and maintained some lifestyle improvements from baseline through 24 months, including significant improvements for psychosocial outcomes, fat intake, social-environmental support, body mass index, and hemoglobin A1c. Effects tended to diminish over time. The ¡Viva Bien! multiple-behavior program was effective in improving and maintaining some psychosocial, behavioral, and biological outcomes related to heart health across 24 months for Latinas with type 2 diabetes, a high-risk, underserved population (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00233259).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-426
Number of pages11
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

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Hispanic Americans
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Life Style
Mediterranean Diet
Group Processes
Practice Management
Health
Vulnerable Populations
Smoking Cessation
Heart Diseases
Hemoglobins
Body Mass Index
Fats
Exercise
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Latina
  • Multiple behavior change
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Toobert, D. J., Strycker, L. A., King, D. K., Barrera, M., Osuna, D., & Glasgow, R. E. (2011). Long-term outcomes from a multiple-risk-factor diabetes trial for Latinas: ¡Viva Bien! Translational Behavioral Medicine, 1(3), 416-426. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13142-010-0011-1

Long-term outcomes from a multiple-risk-factor diabetes trial for Latinas : ¡Viva Bien! / Toobert, Deborah J.; Strycker, Lisa A.; King, Diane K.; Barrera, Manuel; Osuna, Diego; Glasgow, Russell E.

In: Translational Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 1, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 416-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Toobert, DJ, Strycker, LA, King, DK, Barrera, M, Osuna, D & Glasgow, RE 2011, 'Long-term outcomes from a multiple-risk-factor diabetes trial for Latinas: ¡Viva Bien!', Translational Behavioral Medicine, vol. 1, no. 3, pp. 416-426. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13142-010-0011-1
Toobert, Deborah J. ; Strycker, Lisa A. ; King, Diane K. ; Barrera, Manuel ; Osuna, Diego ; Glasgow, Russell E. / Long-term outcomes from a multiple-risk-factor diabetes trial for Latinas : ¡Viva Bien!. In: Translational Behavioral Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 1, No. 3. pp. 416-426.
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