Long-term management of the patient with stable angina.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in the pharmacologic, medical, and surgical treatment of ischemic heart disease have led to the recognition of new goals in the treatment of patients with stable angina, including the relief of symptoms, treatment of underlying causes, and the enhancement of their quality of life. As research continues to provide more information about the pathophysiologic process of ischemic heart disease, new procedures, diagnostics, and management techniques will continue to emerge. In considering the long-term management of patients with stable angina, the primary role of the nurse is in providing relevant information regarding the management of anginal symptoms and related lifestyle modifications. Integrating knowledge of the disease process and its treatment into nursing practice will achieve a comprehensive plan of nursing care that addresses the physiologic, psychosocial, and educational needs of the patient and family members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-230
Number of pages26
JournalNursing Clinics of North America
Volume27
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stable Angina
Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures
Myocardial Ischemia
Patient Care Planning
Information Management
Nurse's Role
Therapeutics
Life Style
Nursing
Quality of Life
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Long-term management of the patient with stable angina. / Fleury, Julie.

In: Nursing Clinics of North America, Vol. 27, No. 1, 03.1992, p. 205-230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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