Long-term Effects of the Family Check-Up on Suicidality in Childhood and Adolescence: Integrative Data Analysis of Three Randomized Trials

Arin M. Connell, Samuel Seidman, Thao Ha, Elizabeth Stormshak, Erika Westling, Melvin Wilson, Daniel Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study employed integrative data analysis techniques to examine the long-term effects of the family check-up (FCU) on changes in youth suicide risk using three randomized prevention trials, including one trial initiated in early childhood and two initiated in early adolescence. Data were harmonized across studies using moderated nonlinear factor analysis, and intervention effects were tested using an autoregressive latent trajectory model examining changes in suicide risk across long-term follow-up. Across trials, significant long-term effects of the FCU on reductions in suicide risk were observed, although differences between intervention and control group trajectories declined over time. No moderation of intervention effects was observed by youth gender or race/ethnicity or across samples. While results offer further support for the benefits of the FCU for suicide risk reduction, they also suggest that such effects may wane over time, underscoring the need for continued development of the FCU to enhance longer-term durability of effects on suicide-related behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPrevention Science
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Childhood
  • Family check-up
  • Parenting
  • Prevention
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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