Long-Term Effects of the Family Check-Up in Public Secondary School on Diagnosed Major Depressive Disorder in Adulthood

Arin M. Connell, Thomas J. Dishion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Given the public health importance of depression, the identification of prevention programs with long-term effects on reducing the rate of depression is of critical importance, as is the examination of factors that may moderate the magnitude of such prevention effects. This study examines the impact of the Family Check-Up, delivered in public secondary schools beginning in sixth grade, on the development of major depression in adulthood (aged 28–30). The multilevel intervention program included (a) a universal classroom-based intervention focused on problem solving and peer relationship skills, (b) the Family Check-Up (selected), a brief assessment-based intervention designed to motivate parents to improve aspects of family functioning when warranted, and (c) family management treatment (indicated), focused on improving parenting skills. Demographic (gender and ethnicity) and baseline risk factors (family conflict, academic problems, antisocial behavior, and peer deviance) were examined as possible moderators in logistic regression analyses. Intervention effects on depression were moderated by baseline family conflict and academic performance, with stronger intervention effects for youth with low grade point averages and from low-conflict families at baseline. Such findings extend the emerging literature on prevention programs with long-term effects on depression, and highlight directions for future research to enhance such effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 20 2016

Fingerprint

Major Depressive Disorder
adulthood
secondary school
Depression
Family Conflict
Parenting
Public Health
Parents
Logistic Models
deviant behavior
Regression Analysis
moderator
Demography
parents
ethnicity
public health
school grade
logistics
regression
classroom

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Family intervention
  • Moderators
  • Prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Long-Term Effects of the Family Check-Up in Public Secondary School on Diagnosed Major Depressive Disorder in Adulthood. / Connell, Arin M.; Dishion, Thomas J.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 20.04.2016, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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