Locating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds

Wenbo Tang, George Haller, Jong Jin Baik, Young Hee Ryu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Finite-size particle motion in fluids obeys the Maxey-Riley equations, which become singular in the limit of infinitesimally small particle size. Because of this singularity, finding the source of a dispersed set of small particles is a numerically ill-posed problem that leads to exponential blowup. Here we use recent results on the existence of a slow manifold in the Maxey-Riley equations to overcome this difficulty in source inversion. Specifically, we locate the source of particles by projecting their dispersed positions on a time-varying slow manifold, and by advecting them on the manifold in backward time. We use this technique to locate the source of a hypothetical anthrax release in an unsteady three-dimensional atmospheric wind field in an urban street canyon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number043302
JournalPhysics of Fluids
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

contamination
Contamination
Particle size
streets
Fluids
canyons
particle motion
inversions
fluids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Locating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds. / Tang, Wenbo; Haller, George; Baik, Jong Jin; Ryu, Young Hee.

In: Physics of Fluids, Vol. 21, No. 4, 043302, 2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tang, Wenbo ; Haller, George ; Baik, Jong Jin ; Ryu, Young Hee. / Locating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds. In: Physics of Fluids. 2009 ; Vol. 21, No. 4.
@article{2c717f640deb45e8820e3e5faa7232a4,
title = "Locating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds",
abstract = "Finite-size particle motion in fluids obeys the Maxey-Riley equations, which become singular in the limit of infinitesimally small particle size. Because of this singularity, finding the source of a dispersed set of small particles is a numerically ill-posed problem that leads to exponential blowup. Here we use recent results on the existence of a slow manifold in the Maxey-Riley equations to overcome this difficulty in source inversion. Specifically, we locate the source of particles by projecting their dispersed positions on a time-varying slow manifold, and by advecting them on the manifold in backward time. We use this technique to locate the source of a hypothetical anthrax release in an unsteady three-dimensional atmospheric wind field in an urban street canyon.",
author = "Wenbo Tang and George Haller and Baik, {Jong Jin} and Ryu, {Young Hee}",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1063/1.3115065",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
journal = "Physics of Fluids",
issn = "1070-6631",
publisher = "American Institute of Physics Publising LLC",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Locating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds

AU - Tang, Wenbo

AU - Haller, George

AU - Baik, Jong Jin

AU - Ryu, Young Hee

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Finite-size particle motion in fluids obeys the Maxey-Riley equations, which become singular in the limit of infinitesimally small particle size. Because of this singularity, finding the source of a dispersed set of small particles is a numerically ill-posed problem that leads to exponential blowup. Here we use recent results on the existence of a slow manifold in the Maxey-Riley equations to overcome this difficulty in source inversion. Specifically, we locate the source of particles by projecting their dispersed positions on a time-varying slow manifold, and by advecting them on the manifold in backward time. We use this technique to locate the source of a hypothetical anthrax release in an unsteady three-dimensional atmospheric wind field in an urban street canyon.

AB - Finite-size particle motion in fluids obeys the Maxey-Riley equations, which become singular in the limit of infinitesimally small particle size. Because of this singularity, finding the source of a dispersed set of small particles is a numerically ill-posed problem that leads to exponential blowup. Here we use recent results on the existence of a slow manifold in the Maxey-Riley equations to overcome this difficulty in source inversion. Specifically, we locate the source of particles by projecting their dispersed positions on a time-varying slow manifold, and by advecting them on the manifold in backward time. We use this technique to locate the source of a hypothetical anthrax release in an unsteady three-dimensional atmospheric wind field in an urban street canyon.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=65549088094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=65549088094&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1063/1.3115065

DO - 10.1063/1.3115065

M3 - Article

VL - 21

JO - Physics of Fluids

JF - Physics of Fluids

SN - 1070-6631

IS - 4

M1 - 043302

ER -