Local inhibition of uptake 2 transporters augments stress-induced increases in serotonin in the rat central amygdala

James E. Hassell, Victoria E. Collins, Hao Li, Joshua T. Rogers, Ryan C. Austin, Ciprian Visceau, Kadi T. Nguyen, Miles Orchinik, Christopher A. Lowry, Kenneth J. Renner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) is a corticosterone-sensitive, low-affinity, high-capacity transporter. This transporter functions, in part, to clear monoamines, including serotonin (5-HT), from the extracellular space. The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is an important structure controlling fear- and anxiety-related behaviors. The CeA has reciprocal connections with brainstem nuclei containing monoaminergic systems, including serotonergic systems arising from the dorsal raphe nucleus, which are thought to play an important role in modulation of CeA-mediated behavioral responses. Organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) is expressed in the CeA, but little is known about the role of OCT3 within the CeA in modulating serotonergic signaling. We hypothesized that inhibition of OCT3-mediated transport in the CeA during restraint stress would increase extracellular 5-HT. In Experiment 1, rats received unilateral reverse dialysis of either corticosterone or normetanephrine, which interfere with OCT3-mediated transport, into the CeA under home cage control conditions. In Experiment 2, rats received unilateral reverse dialysis of corticosterone, normetanephrine, or vehicle into the CeA, while undergoing a 40-min period of restraint stress. Infusion of these drugs had no effect on extracellular concentrations of 5-HT during home cage control conditions, but, in contrast, markedly increased extracellular concentrations of 5-HT during restraint stress, relative to vehicle-treated controls. These findings suggest a role for OCT3 in the CeA in control of serotonergic signaling during stressful conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-124
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume701
DOIs
StatePublished - May 14 2019

Fingerprint

Serotonin
Cations
Corticosterone
Normetanephrine
Dialysis
Central Amygdaloid Nucleus
Inhibition (Psychology)
Extracellular Space
Brain Stem
Fear
Anxiety
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Microdialysis
  • Normetanephrine
  • OCT3
  • Serotonin
  • uptake2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Hassell, J. E., Collins, V. E., Li, H., Rogers, J. T., Austin, R. C., Visceau, C., ... Renner, K. J. (2019). Local inhibition of uptake 2 transporters augments stress-induced increases in serotonin in the rat central amygdala Neuroscience Letters, 701, 119-124. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2019.02.022

Local inhibition of uptake 2 transporters augments stress-induced increases in serotonin in the rat central amygdala . / Hassell, James E.; Collins, Victoria E.; Li, Hao; Rogers, Joshua T.; Austin, Ryan C.; Visceau, Ciprian; Nguyen, Kadi T.; Orchinik, Miles; Lowry, Christopher A.; Renner, Kenneth J.

In: Neuroscience Letters, Vol. 701, 14.05.2019, p. 119-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hassell, JE, Collins, VE, Li, H, Rogers, JT, Austin, RC, Visceau, C, Nguyen, KT, Orchinik, M, Lowry, CA & Renner, KJ 2019, ' Local inhibition of uptake 2 transporters augments stress-induced increases in serotonin in the rat central amygdala ', Neuroscience Letters, vol. 701, pp. 119-124. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2019.02.022
Hassell, James E. ; Collins, Victoria E. ; Li, Hao ; Rogers, Joshua T. ; Austin, Ryan C. ; Visceau, Ciprian ; Nguyen, Kadi T. ; Orchinik, Miles ; Lowry, Christopher A. ; Renner, Kenneth J. / Local inhibition of uptake 2 transporters augments stress-induced increases in serotonin in the rat central amygdala In: Neuroscience Letters. 2019 ; Vol. 701. pp. 119-124.
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AU - Austin, Ryan C.

AU - Visceau, Ciprian

AU - Nguyen, Kadi T.

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