Lizards fail to plastically adjust nesting behavior or thermal tolerance as needed to buffer populations from climate warming

Rory S. Telemeco, Brooke Fletcher, Ofir Levy, Angela Riley, Yesenia Rodriguez-Sanchez, Colton Smith, Collin Teague, Amanda Waters, Michael Angilletta, Lauren B. Buckley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although observations suggest the potential for phenotypic plasticity to allow adaptive responses to climate change, few experiments have assessed that potential. Modeling suggests that Sceloporus tristichus lizards will need increased nest depth, shade cover, or embryonic thermal tolerance to avoid reproductive failure resulting from climate change. To test for such plasticity, we experimentally examined how maternal temperatures affect nesting behavior and embryonic thermal sensitivity. The temperature regime that females experienced while gravid did not affect nesting behavior, but warmer temperatures at the time of nesting reduced nest depth. Additionally, embryos from heat-stressed mothers displayed increased sensitivity to high-temperature exposure. Simulations suggest that critically low temperatures, rather than high temperatures, historically limit development of our study population. Thus, the plasticity needed to buffer this population has not been under selection. Plasticity will likely fail to compensate for ongoing climate change when such change results in novel stressors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalGlobal Change Biology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Nesting Behavior
nesting behavior
Lizards
Climate
lizard
plasticity
Buffers
warming
tolerance
climate change
Temperature
Plasticity
Climate Change
nest
climate
Climate change
Population
temperature
phenotypic plasticity
embryo

Keywords

  • Sceloporus tristichus
  • Sceloporus undulatus
  • Incubation
  • Mechanistic model
  • Phenotypic plasticity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Medicine(all)
  • Ecology
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Telemeco, R. S., Fletcher, B., Levy, O., Riley, A., Rodriguez-Sanchez, Y., Smith, C., ... Buckley, L. B. (Accepted/In press). Lizards fail to plastically adjust nesting behavior or thermal tolerance as needed to buffer populations from climate warming. Global Change Biology. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.13476

Lizards fail to plastically adjust nesting behavior or thermal tolerance as needed to buffer populations from climate warming. / Telemeco, Rory S.; Fletcher, Brooke; Levy, Ofir; Riley, Angela; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Yesenia; Smith, Colton; Teague, Collin; Waters, Amanda; Angilletta, Michael; Buckley, Lauren B.

In: Global Change Biology, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Telemeco, Rory S. ; Fletcher, Brooke ; Levy, Ofir ; Riley, Angela ; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Yesenia ; Smith, Colton ; Teague, Collin ; Waters, Amanda ; Angilletta, Michael ; Buckley, Lauren B. / Lizards fail to plastically adjust nesting behavior or thermal tolerance as needed to buffer populations from climate warming. In: Global Change Biology. 2016.
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