Linking Genes to Neurological Clinical Practice: The Genomic Basis for Neurorehabilitation

Allon Goldberg, Catherine L. Curtis, Jeffrey Kleim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Large-scale genomics projects such as the Human Genome Project and the International HapMap Project promise significant advances in the ability to diagnose and treat many conditions, including those with a neurological basis. A major focus of research has emerged in the neurological sciences to elucidate the molecular and genetic basis of various neurological diseases. Indeed, genetic factors are implicated in susceptibility for many neurological disorders, with family history studies providing strong evidence of familial risk for conditions such as stroke, Parkinsonʼs, Alzheimerʼs, and Huntingtonʼs diseases. Heritability studies also suggest a strong genetic contribution to the risk for neurological diseases. Genome-wide association studies are also uncovering novel genetic variants associated with neurological disorders. Whole-genome and exome sequencing are likely to provide novel insights into the genetic basis of neurological disorders. Genetic factors are similarly associated with clinical phenotypes such as symptom severity and progression as well as response to treatment. Specifically, disease progression and functional restoration depend, in part, on the capacity for neural plasticity within residual neural tissues. Furthermore, such plasticity may be influenced in part by the presence of polymorphisms in several genes known to orchestrate neural plasticity including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Apolipoprotein E. (APOE). It is important for neurorehabilitation therapist practicing in the “genomic era” to be aware of the potential influence of genetic factors during clinical encounters, as advances in molecular sciences are revealing information of critical relevance to the clinical rehabilitation management of individuals with neurological conditions.Video Abstract available (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A88) for more insights from the authors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Neurologic Physical Therapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 20 2014

Fingerprint

Nervous System Diseases
Neuronal Plasticity
Information Science
HapMap Project
Genes
Exome
Human Genome Project
Aptitude
Genome-Wide Association Study
Huntington Disease
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor
Apolipoproteins E
Genomics
Parkinson Disease
Disease Progression
Molecular Biology
Alzheimer Disease
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Linking Genes to Neurological Clinical Practice : The Genomic Basis for Neurorehabilitation. / Goldberg, Allon; Curtis, Catherine L.; Kleim, Jeffrey.

In: Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, 20.11.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{35d389ca933e483eb23d7dfca2c66f7d,
title = "Linking Genes to Neurological Clinical Practice: The Genomic Basis for Neurorehabilitation",
abstract = "Large-scale genomics projects such as the Human Genome Project and the International HapMap Project promise significant advances in the ability to diagnose and treat many conditions, including those with a neurological basis. A major focus of research has emerged in the neurological sciences to elucidate the molecular and genetic basis of various neurological diseases. Indeed, genetic factors are implicated in susceptibility for many neurological disorders, with family history studies providing strong evidence of familial risk for conditions such as stroke, Parkinsonʼs, Alzheimerʼs, and Huntingtonʼs diseases. Heritability studies also suggest a strong genetic contribution to the risk for neurological diseases. Genome-wide association studies are also uncovering novel genetic variants associated with neurological disorders. Whole-genome and exome sequencing are likely to provide novel insights into the genetic basis of neurological disorders. Genetic factors are similarly associated with clinical phenotypes such as symptom severity and progression as well as response to treatment. Specifically, disease progression and functional restoration depend, in part, on the capacity for neural plasticity within residual neural tissues. Furthermore, such plasticity may be influenced in part by the presence of polymorphisms in several genes known to orchestrate neural plasticity including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Apolipoprotein E. (APOE). It is important for neurorehabilitation therapist practicing in the “genomic era” to be aware of the potential influence of genetic factors during clinical encounters, as advances in molecular sciences are revealing information of critical relevance to the clinical rehabilitation management of individuals with neurological conditions.Video Abstract available (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A88) for more insights from the authors.",
author = "Allon Goldberg and Curtis, {Catherine L.} and Jeffrey Kleim",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1097/NPT.0000000000000066",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy",
issn = "1557-0576",
publisher = "American Physical Therapy Association",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Linking Genes to Neurological Clinical Practice

T2 - The Genomic Basis for Neurorehabilitation

AU - Goldberg, Allon

AU - Curtis, Catherine L.

AU - Kleim, Jeffrey

PY - 2014/11/20

Y1 - 2014/11/20

N2 - Large-scale genomics projects such as the Human Genome Project and the International HapMap Project promise significant advances in the ability to diagnose and treat many conditions, including those with a neurological basis. A major focus of research has emerged in the neurological sciences to elucidate the molecular and genetic basis of various neurological diseases. Indeed, genetic factors are implicated in susceptibility for many neurological disorders, with family history studies providing strong evidence of familial risk for conditions such as stroke, Parkinsonʼs, Alzheimerʼs, and Huntingtonʼs diseases. Heritability studies also suggest a strong genetic contribution to the risk for neurological diseases. Genome-wide association studies are also uncovering novel genetic variants associated with neurological disorders. Whole-genome and exome sequencing are likely to provide novel insights into the genetic basis of neurological disorders. Genetic factors are similarly associated with clinical phenotypes such as symptom severity and progression as well as response to treatment. Specifically, disease progression and functional restoration depend, in part, on the capacity for neural plasticity within residual neural tissues. Furthermore, such plasticity may be influenced in part by the presence of polymorphisms in several genes known to orchestrate neural plasticity including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Apolipoprotein E. (APOE). It is important for neurorehabilitation therapist practicing in the “genomic era” to be aware of the potential influence of genetic factors during clinical encounters, as advances in molecular sciences are revealing information of critical relevance to the clinical rehabilitation management of individuals with neurological conditions.Video Abstract available (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A88) for more insights from the authors.

AB - Large-scale genomics projects such as the Human Genome Project and the International HapMap Project promise significant advances in the ability to diagnose and treat many conditions, including those with a neurological basis. A major focus of research has emerged in the neurological sciences to elucidate the molecular and genetic basis of various neurological diseases. Indeed, genetic factors are implicated in susceptibility for many neurological disorders, with family history studies providing strong evidence of familial risk for conditions such as stroke, Parkinsonʼs, Alzheimerʼs, and Huntingtonʼs diseases. Heritability studies also suggest a strong genetic contribution to the risk for neurological diseases. Genome-wide association studies are also uncovering novel genetic variants associated with neurological disorders. Whole-genome and exome sequencing are likely to provide novel insights into the genetic basis of neurological disorders. Genetic factors are similarly associated with clinical phenotypes such as symptom severity and progression as well as response to treatment. Specifically, disease progression and functional restoration depend, in part, on the capacity for neural plasticity within residual neural tissues. Furthermore, such plasticity may be influenced in part by the presence of polymorphisms in several genes known to orchestrate neural plasticity including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Apolipoprotein E. (APOE). It is important for neurorehabilitation therapist practicing in the “genomic era” to be aware of the potential influence of genetic factors during clinical encounters, as advances in molecular sciences are revealing information of critical relevance to the clinical rehabilitation management of individuals with neurological conditions.Video Abstract available (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A88) for more insights from the authors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84912034789&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84912034789&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/NPT.0000000000000066

DO - 10.1097/NPT.0000000000000066

M3 - Article

C2 - 25415554

AN - SCOPUS:84912034789

JO - Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy

JF - Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy

SN - 1557-0576

ER -