Linkages between animal and human health sentinel data

Matthew Scotch, Lynda Odofin, Peter Rabinowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: In order to identify priorities for building integrated surveillance systems that effectively model and predict human risk of zoonotic diseases, there is a need for improved understanding of the practical options for linking surveillance data of animals and humans. We conducted an analysis of the literature and characterized the linkage between animal and human health data. We discuss the findings in relation to zoonotic surveillance and the linkage of human and animal data.Methods: The Canary Database, an online bibliographic database of animal-sentinel studies was searched and articles were classified according to four linkage categories.Results: 465 studies were identified and assigned to linkage categories involving: descriptive, analytic, molecular, or no human outcomes of human and animal health. Descriptive linkage was the most common, whereby both animal and human health outcomes were presented, but without quantitative linkage between the two. Rarely, analytic linkage was utilized in which animal data was used to quantitatively predict human risk. The other two categories included molecular linkage, and no human outcomes, which present health outcomes in animals but not humans.Discussion: We found limited use of animal data to quantitatively predict human risk and listed the methods from the literature that performed analytic linkage. The lack of analytic linkage in the literature might not be solely related to technological barriers including access to electronic database, statistical software packages, and Geographical Information System (GIS). Rather, the problem might be from a lack of understanding by researchers of the importance of animal data as a 'sentinel' for human health. Researchers performing zoonotic surveillance should be aware of the value of animal-sentinel approaches for predicting human risk and consider analytic methods for linking animal and human data. Qualitative work needs to be done in order to examine researchers' decisions in linkage strategies between animal and human data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number15
JournalBMC Veterinary Research
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 23 2009
Externally publishedYes

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animal and human health
Health
animals
sentinel animals
Zoonoses
monitoring
researchers
Research Personnel
cyhalothrin
canaries
Canaries
zoonoses
Databases
Bibliographic Databases
geographic information systems
Geographic Information Systems
electronics
human health
methodology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Linkages between animal and human health sentinel data. / Scotch, Matthew; Odofin, Lynda; Rabinowitz, Peter.

In: BMC Veterinary Research, Vol. 5, 15, 23.04.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scotch, Matthew ; Odofin, Lynda ; Rabinowitz, Peter. / Linkages between animal and human health sentinel data. In: BMC Veterinary Research. 2009 ; Vol. 5.
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