Linear parks and urban neighbourhoods: A study of the crime impact of the Boston South-west Corridor

K. Crewe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tests the crime impact of the Boston South-west Corridor parkland, a 5-mile transit and linear park, on its adjoining neighbourhoods 15 years after its completion in the early 1980s. The study responds to concerns of local neighbourhoods during the time of planning and construction, and to evidence of general public uneasiness about the dangers of linear parks to communities. In an analysis of two residential neighbourhoods adjoining the corridor, the study searched first for evidence of crime spill-over from the corridor, and secondly for neighbours' perceptions of corridor safety. To test crime spill-over, police calls from houses adjacent to the corridor were compared with calls from houses further away; interviews with residents investigated perceptions of the corridor's safety. Findings revealed that though police calls were marginally more frequent from houses next to the corridor, these were considerably less frequent than calls from houses next to commercial streets. Interviews with residents revealed generally positive estimates of park safety by day, with low estimates of night-time safety and mixed estimates of its safety during twilight hours. Interviews also revealed heavy reliance on the corridor by the elderly and people with small children. The study concludes with recommendations for the future design of linear parks in cities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-264
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Urban Design
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

crime
offense
safety
police
interview
resident
evidence
twilight
planning
corridor
Southwest
Crime
Safety
community
time
Police
Residents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Linear parks and urban neighbourhoods : A study of the crime impact of the Boston South-west Corridor. / Crewe, K.

In: Journal of Urban Design, Vol. 6, No. 3, 2001, p. 245-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4a157ba1356b48a48d51c63dbbe6328b,
title = "Linear parks and urban neighbourhoods: A study of the crime impact of the Boston South-west Corridor",
abstract = "This study tests the crime impact of the Boston South-west Corridor parkland, a 5-mile transit and linear park, on its adjoining neighbourhoods 15 years after its completion in the early 1980s. The study responds to concerns of local neighbourhoods during the time of planning and construction, and to evidence of general public uneasiness about the dangers of linear parks to communities. In an analysis of two residential neighbourhoods adjoining the corridor, the study searched first for evidence of crime spill-over from the corridor, and secondly for neighbours' perceptions of corridor safety. To test crime spill-over, police calls from houses adjacent to the corridor were compared with calls from houses further away; interviews with residents investigated perceptions of the corridor's safety. Findings revealed that though police calls were marginally more frequent from houses next to the corridor, these were considerably less frequent than calls from houses next to commercial streets. Interviews with residents revealed generally positive estimates of park safety by day, with low estimates of night-time safety and mixed estimates of its safety during twilight hours. Interviews also revealed heavy reliance on the corridor by the elderly and people with small children. The study concludes with recommendations for the future design of linear parks in cities.",
author = "K. Crewe",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1080/13574800120105779",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "245--264",
journal = "Journal of Urban Design",
issn = "1357-4809",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Linear parks and urban neighbourhoods

T2 - A study of the crime impact of the Boston South-west Corridor

AU - Crewe, K.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - This study tests the crime impact of the Boston South-west Corridor parkland, a 5-mile transit and linear park, on its adjoining neighbourhoods 15 years after its completion in the early 1980s. The study responds to concerns of local neighbourhoods during the time of planning and construction, and to evidence of general public uneasiness about the dangers of linear parks to communities. In an analysis of two residential neighbourhoods adjoining the corridor, the study searched first for evidence of crime spill-over from the corridor, and secondly for neighbours' perceptions of corridor safety. To test crime spill-over, police calls from houses adjacent to the corridor were compared with calls from houses further away; interviews with residents investigated perceptions of the corridor's safety. Findings revealed that though police calls were marginally more frequent from houses next to the corridor, these were considerably less frequent than calls from houses next to commercial streets. Interviews with residents revealed generally positive estimates of park safety by day, with low estimates of night-time safety and mixed estimates of its safety during twilight hours. Interviews also revealed heavy reliance on the corridor by the elderly and people with small children. The study concludes with recommendations for the future design of linear parks in cities.

AB - This study tests the crime impact of the Boston South-west Corridor parkland, a 5-mile transit and linear park, on its adjoining neighbourhoods 15 years after its completion in the early 1980s. The study responds to concerns of local neighbourhoods during the time of planning and construction, and to evidence of general public uneasiness about the dangers of linear parks to communities. In an analysis of two residential neighbourhoods adjoining the corridor, the study searched first for evidence of crime spill-over from the corridor, and secondly for neighbours' perceptions of corridor safety. To test crime spill-over, police calls from houses adjacent to the corridor were compared with calls from houses further away; interviews with residents investigated perceptions of the corridor's safety. Findings revealed that though police calls were marginally more frequent from houses next to the corridor, these were considerably less frequent than calls from houses next to commercial streets. Interviews with residents revealed generally positive estimates of park safety by day, with low estimates of night-time safety and mixed estimates of its safety during twilight hours. Interviews also revealed heavy reliance on the corridor by the elderly and people with small children. The study concludes with recommendations for the future design of linear parks in cities.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035678139&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035678139&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13574800120105779

DO - 10.1080/13574800120105779

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0035678139

VL - 6

SP - 245

EP - 264

JO - Journal of Urban Design

JF - Journal of Urban Design

SN - 1357-4809

IS - 3

ER -