Limitations on the use of a single screening question to measure sedentary behavior

C. A. Macera, S. A. Ham, D. A. Jones, C. D. Kimsey, Barbara Ainsworth, L. J. Neff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. This study explored the limitations of identifying sedentary individuals via an existing screening question in a state-based surveillance system. Methods. A national sample (n = 7529) of adults, selected by random-digit dialing between November 1999 and May 2000, responded about participation in leisure-time physical activity. Results. Of those who initially reported no leisure-time physical activity (25%), 85% were engaging in at least some activity, and 20% were engaging in enough moderate- or vigorous-intensity activity to meet health-related recommendations. Conclusions. Public health programs that use only 1 screening question to identify sedentary behavior may not be able to target physical activity messages effectively, especially if physical activity is defined to include a broad range of activities beyond sports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2010-2012
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume91
Issue number12
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Leisure Activities
Sports
Public Health
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Macera, C. A., Ham, S. A., Jones, D. A., Kimsey, C. D., Ainsworth, B., & Neff, L. J. (2001). Limitations on the use of a single screening question to measure sedentary behavior. American Journal of Public Health, 91(12), 2010-2012.

Limitations on the use of a single screening question to measure sedentary behavior. / Macera, C. A.; Ham, S. A.; Jones, D. A.; Kimsey, C. D.; Ainsworth, Barbara; Neff, L. J.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 91, No. 12, 2001, p. 2010-2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Macera, CA, Ham, SA, Jones, DA, Kimsey, CD, Ainsworth, B & Neff, LJ 2001, 'Limitations on the use of a single screening question to measure sedentary behavior', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 91, no. 12, pp. 2010-2012.
Macera CA, Ham SA, Jones DA, Kimsey CD, Ainsworth B, Neff LJ. Limitations on the use of a single screening question to measure sedentary behavior. American Journal of Public Health. 2001;91(12):2010-2012.
Macera, C. A. ; Ham, S. A. ; Jones, D. A. ; Kimsey, C. D. ; Ainsworth, Barbara ; Neff, L. J. / Limitations on the use of a single screening question to measure sedentary behavior. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2001 ; Vol. 91, No. 12. pp. 2010-2012.
@article{fddd16eefe9046b686da3ce50ad88b6a,
title = "Limitations on the use of a single screening question to measure sedentary behavior",
abstract = "Objectives. This study explored the limitations of identifying sedentary individuals via an existing screening question in a state-based surveillance system. Methods. A national sample (n = 7529) of adults, selected by random-digit dialing between November 1999 and May 2000, responded about participation in leisure-time physical activity. Results. Of those who initially reported no leisure-time physical activity (25{\%}), 85{\%} were engaging in at least some activity, and 20{\%} were engaging in enough moderate- or vigorous-intensity activity to meet health-related recommendations. Conclusions. Public health programs that use only 1 screening question to identify sedentary behavior may not be able to target physical activity messages effectively, especially if physical activity is defined to include a broad range of activities beyond sports.",
author = "Macera, {C. A.} and Ham, {S. A.} and Jones, {D. A.} and Kimsey, {C. D.} and Barbara Ainsworth and Neff, {L. J.}",
year = "2001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "91",
pages = "2010--2012",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Limitations on the use of a single screening question to measure sedentary behavior

AU - Macera, C. A.

AU - Ham, S. A.

AU - Jones, D. A.

AU - Kimsey, C. D.

AU - Ainsworth, Barbara

AU - Neff, L. J.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Objectives. This study explored the limitations of identifying sedentary individuals via an existing screening question in a state-based surveillance system. Methods. A national sample (n = 7529) of adults, selected by random-digit dialing between November 1999 and May 2000, responded about participation in leisure-time physical activity. Results. Of those who initially reported no leisure-time physical activity (25%), 85% were engaging in at least some activity, and 20% were engaging in enough moderate- or vigorous-intensity activity to meet health-related recommendations. Conclusions. Public health programs that use only 1 screening question to identify sedentary behavior may not be able to target physical activity messages effectively, especially if physical activity is defined to include a broad range of activities beyond sports.

AB - Objectives. This study explored the limitations of identifying sedentary individuals via an existing screening question in a state-based surveillance system. Methods. A national sample (n = 7529) of adults, selected by random-digit dialing between November 1999 and May 2000, responded about participation in leisure-time physical activity. Results. Of those who initially reported no leisure-time physical activity (25%), 85% were engaging in at least some activity, and 20% were engaging in enough moderate- or vigorous-intensity activity to meet health-related recommendations. Conclusions. Public health programs that use only 1 screening question to identify sedentary behavior may not be able to target physical activity messages effectively, especially if physical activity is defined to include a broad range of activities beyond sports.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035204758&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035204758&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11726385

AN - SCOPUS:0035204758

VL - 91

SP - 2010

EP - 2012

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 12

ER -