Light to moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower frequency of hypertransaminasemia

Ayako Suzuki, Paul Angulo, Jennifer St. Sauver, Ayako Muto, Toshihide Okada, Keith Lindor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The effect of light to moderate alcohol consumption on the liver is controversial. To determine the association between light to moderate alcohol consumption and frequency of hypertransaminasemia, a cross-sectional and a subsequent longitudinal cohort study were conducted using annual health checkup data at a Japanese workplace. METHODS: We analyzed 1,177 male subjects (age 20-59) without HCV or HBV infection or other chronic liver diseases. To determine the association between alcohol consumption (none or minimal <70 g/wk, light ≥70 g and <140 g/wk, moderate ≥140 g and <280 g/wk, excessive ≥280 g/wk) and hypertransaminasemia, we performed multiple logistic regressions. We then followed 326 subjects without a history of fatty liver or hypertransaminasemia up to 5 years for incidental hypertransaminasemia and performed Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: Excess alcohol consumption was associated with increased odds of hypertransaminasemia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR ] versus none or minimal consumption 1.4 [1.1-1.93 ], P = 0.023). There was significant interaction between age group and alcohol consumption (P < 0.01). In the younger group, moderate consumption was associated with decreased odds (AOR 0.5 [0.3-0.9 ], P = 0.032), while in the older group, light consumption was associated with decreased odds (AOR 0.6 [0.4-1.0 ], P = 0.036) and excess consumption was associated with increased odds (AOR 1.6 [1.1-2.3 ], P = 0.014) of hypertransaminasemia. During follow-up, moderate consumption was associated with decreased incidence of hypertransaminasemia versus none or minimal consumption (adjusted hazard ratio 0.4 [0.1-0.9 ], P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Light to moderate alcohol consumption may protect against the development of hypertransaminasemia among male subjects without other liver conditions. Further studies are required before recommending light to moderate alcohol consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1912-1919
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume102
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Alcohol Drinking
Light
Odds Ratio
Liver
Fatty Liver
Workplace
Longitudinal Studies
Liver Diseases
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Age Groups
Logistic Models
Incidence
Health
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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Light to moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower frequency of hypertransaminasemia. / Suzuki, Ayako; Angulo, Paul; St. Sauver, Jennifer; Muto, Ayako; Okada, Toshihide; Lindor, Keith.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 102, No. 9, 09.2007, p. 1912-1919.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suzuki, Ayako ; Angulo, Paul ; St. Sauver, Jennifer ; Muto, Ayako ; Okada, Toshihide ; Lindor, Keith. / Light to moderate alcohol consumption is associated with lower frequency of hypertransaminasemia. In: American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2007 ; Vol. 102, No. 9. pp. 1912-1919.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES: The effect of light to moderate alcohol consumption on the liver is controversial. To determine the association between light to moderate alcohol consumption and frequency of hypertransaminasemia, a cross-sectional and a subsequent longitudinal cohort study were conducted using annual health checkup data at a Japanese workplace. METHODS: We analyzed 1,177 male subjects (age 20-59) without HCV or HBV infection or other chronic liver diseases. To determine the association between alcohol consumption (none or minimal <70 g/wk, light ≥70 g and <140 g/wk, moderate ≥140 g and <280 g/wk, excessive ≥280 g/wk) and hypertransaminasemia, we performed multiple logistic regressions. We then followed 326 subjects without a history of fatty liver or hypertransaminasemia up to 5 years for incidental hypertransaminasemia and performed Cox proportional hazard regressions. RESULTS: Excess alcohol consumption was associated with increased odds of hypertransaminasemia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR ] versus none or minimal consumption 1.4 [1.1-1.93 ], P = 0.023). There was significant interaction between age group and alcohol consumption (P < 0.01). In the younger group, moderate consumption was associated with decreased odds (AOR 0.5 [0.3-0.9 ], P = 0.032), while in the older group, light consumption was associated with decreased odds (AOR 0.6 [0.4-1.0 ], P = 0.036) and excess consumption was associated with increased odds (AOR 1.6 [1.1-2.3 ], P = 0.014) of hypertransaminasemia. During follow-up, moderate consumption was associated with decreased incidence of hypertransaminasemia versus none or minimal consumption (adjusted hazard ratio 0.4 [0.1-0.9 ], P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Light to moderate alcohol consumption may protect against the development of hypertransaminasemia among male subjects without other liver conditions. Further studies are required before recommending light to moderate alcohol consumption.",
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AU - Suzuki, Ayako

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AU - St. Sauver, Jennifer

AU - Muto, Ayako

AU - Okada, Toshihide

AU - Lindor, Keith

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