Abstract

The architecture-engineering-construction (AEC) industry faces increasing demands on its projects while budgets appear to be shrinking. Building owners and operators seem to want their buildings to do more for less cost. Although this may seem counterintuitive, it aligns nicely with a sustainable-architecture approach of less is more. Moreover, in a shift from exclusively considering first costs for a project, the AEC industry seems to be moving in the direction of life-cycle cost considerations, furthering the opportunity for a more sustainable built environment. Often sustainable is synonymous with achieving certification [e.g., Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and Infrastructure Voluntary Evaluation Sustainability Tool (INVEST) certification]. Whereas the authors acknowledge that certification can improve particular aspects of sustainability, it is necessary to take a broader approach and consider economic, environmental, and social dimensions of sustainability. In this paper, the authors explore each of these dimensions and present examples of how the AEC industry can measure, balance, and monetize them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-94
Number of pages6
JournalPractice Periodical on Structural Design and Construction
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2014

Keywords

  • Infrastructure
  • Life cycles
  • Project delivery
  • Project management
  • Sustainable development

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Life-Cycle assessment for construction of sustainable infrastructure'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this