Leveraging a multidimensional linguistic analysis of constructed responses produced by college readers

Joseph P. Magliano, Lauren Flynn, Daniel P. Feller, Kathryn S. McCarthy, Danielle S. McNamara, Laura Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The goal of this study was to assess the relationships between computational approaches to analyzing constructed responses made during reading and individual differences in the foundational skills of reading in college readers. We also explored if these relationships were consistent across texts and samples collected at different institutions and texts. The study made use of archival data that involved college participants who produced typed constructed responses under thinking aloud instructions reading history and science texts. They also took assessments of vocabulary knowledge and proficiency in comprehension. The protocols were analyzed to assess two different ways to determine their cohesion. One approach involved assessing how readers established connections with themselves (i.e., to other constructed responses they produced). The other approach involved assessing connections between the constructed responses and the texts that were read. Additionally, the comparisons were made by assessing both lexical (i.e., word matching) and semantic (i.e., high dimensional semantic spaces) comparisons. The result showed that both approaches for analyzing cohesion and making the comparisons were correlated with vocabulary knowledge and comprehension proficiency. The implications of the results for theory and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number936162
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 2022

Keywords

  • college readers
  • comprehension
  • constructed responses
  • individual differences
  • natural language processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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