Lessons not learned: Why is there still a crisis-level shortage of accounting Ph.D.s?

R. David Plumlee, Philip Reckers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2005, an ad hoc committee appointed by the American Accounting Association (AAA) documented a crisis-level shortage of accounting Ph.D.s and recommended significant structural changes to doctoral programs (Kachelmeier, Madeo, Plumlee, Pratt, and Krull 2005). However, subsequent studies show that the shortage continues and the cumulative costs grow (e.g., Fogarty and Holder 2012; Brink, Glasscock, and Wier 2012). The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) recently called for renewed attention to the problem (AACSB 2013b). We contribute to the literature by providing updated information regarding responses by doctoral programs and, from the eyes of potential candidates, of continuing impediments to solving the doctoral shortage. In this paper, we present information gathered through surveys of program administrators and master's and Accounting Doctoral Scholars Program (ADS) students. We explore (1) the cumulative impact of the Ph.D. shortage as of 2013, including its impact on accounting faculty composition, across different types of institutions, (2) negative student perceptions of Ph.D. programs and academic accounting careers, which discourage applicants from pursuing Ph.D. programs, and (3) impediments facing institutions in expanding doctoral programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-330
Number of pages18
JournalAccounting Horizons
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Shortage
Impediments
Structural change
Student perceptions
Ad hoc
Costs

Keywords

  • Accounting Ph.D
  • Faculty shortage
  • Recruiting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Accounting

Cite this

Lessons not learned : Why is there still a crisis-level shortage of accounting Ph.D.s? / David Plumlee, R.; Reckers, Philip.

In: Accounting Horizons, Vol. 28, No. 2, 2014, p. 313-330.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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