Leptin-to-adiponectin ratio as independent predictor of insulin sensitivity during growth in overweight Hispanic youth

C. Koebnick, Gabriel Shaibi, L. A. Kelly, C. K. Roberts, C. J. Lane, C. Toledo-Corral, J. N. Davis, C. Byrd-Williams, M. J. Weigensberg, M. I. Goran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Because leptin and adiponectin are counter-regulated in vivo and exert opposing effects on glucose metabolism, fat oxidation and insulin sensitivity, the ratio of leptin-to-adiponectin has been investigated as a potential atherogenic index, suggesting that the index is a better biomarker for atherosclerotic risk in obese Type 2 diabetic patients than either leptin or adiponectin alone. However, no information is available regarding the leptin-to-adiponectin ratio during adolescence in Hispanic adolescents. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the leptin-to-adiponectin ratio during growth and to establish whether the leptin-to-adiponectin ratio is a better predictor for insulin sensitivity compared to leptin and adiponectin alone in a regression model. From the age of 8 to 14, the leptin-to-adiponectin ratio increased from 2.0±0.8 to 5.8±2.2 in girls, with no significant change noted in boys (gender x age interaction p=0.007). In a multiple regression analysis, including both adiponectin and leptin as independent variables, leptin and adiponectin explained 5% of the variation in insulin sensitivity independent of gender, age, Tanner stage, total fat mass and lean body mass (p for R2-change <0.001). The leptin-to-adiponectin ratio also explained 5% of the variation in insulin sensitivity, after controlling for the same covariates (p for R2-change < 0.001). These data indicate that the leptin-to-adiponectin ratio is not a better predictor of insulin sensitivity during growth than the additive effects of leptin and adiponectin levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Endocrinological Investigation
Volume30
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Adiponectin
Leptin
Hispanic Americans
Insulin Resistance
Growth
Fats
Biomarkers
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Adiponectin
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Leptin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Leptin-to-adiponectin ratio as independent predictor of insulin sensitivity during growth in overweight Hispanic youth. / Koebnick, C.; Shaibi, Gabriel; Kelly, L. A.; Roberts, C. K.; Lane, C. J.; Toledo-Corral, C.; Davis, J. N.; Byrd-Williams, C.; Weigensberg, M. J.; Goran, M. I.

In: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, Vol. 30, No. 7, 07.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koebnick, C, Shaibi, G, Kelly, LA, Roberts, CK, Lane, CJ, Toledo-Corral, C, Davis, JN, Byrd-Williams, C, Weigensberg, MJ & Goran, MI 2007, 'Leptin-to-adiponectin ratio as independent predictor of insulin sensitivity during growth in overweight Hispanic youth', Journal of Endocrinological Investigation, vol. 30, no. 7.
Koebnick, C. ; Shaibi, Gabriel ; Kelly, L. A. ; Roberts, C. K. ; Lane, C. J. ; Toledo-Corral, C. ; Davis, J. N. ; Byrd-Williams, C. ; Weigensberg, M. J. ; Goran, M. I. / Leptin-to-adiponectin ratio as independent predictor of insulin sensitivity during growth in overweight Hispanic youth. In: Journal of Endocrinological Investigation. 2007 ; Vol. 30, No. 7.
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