Learning to cure, but learning to care?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Utilizing interviews with students and a key administrator, analyses of academic schedules, and observations of courses, labs, and small groups, this study examines if and how elements of the explicit preclinical curriculum may have deleterious effects on medical students' humanitarian attributes, namely empathy. Findings from this case-study of a medical school in the United States suggest that the lack of frequent formal testing in the psycho-social aspects of patient care during the preclinical years, as well as a general reduction in curriculum hours devoted to teaching the social aspects of medicine, may serve as mechanisms behind the diminution of medical students' levels of empathy and other positive attributes as found by previous research. Following the basic tenets of the Testing Effect and the assumption that assessment drives learning, it is argued that a feasible way to maintain and potentially cultivate these traits among medical students, without saturating an overwhelmed medical curriculum, would be to install periodic, formally graded exams into preclinical curriculums that evaluate empathy and the psycho-social aspects of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-130
Number of pages22
JournalAdvances in Health Sciences Education
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Empathy
  • Explicit curriculum
  • Medical education
  • Preclinical students
  • Psycho-social issues

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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