Learning from toy makers in the field to inform teaching engineering design in the classroom

Chrissy Hobson Foster, Matthew Dickens, Shawn Jordan, Micah Lande

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the usefulness to leverage activities within the growing Maker Movement and outside of the traditional engineering enterprise to better understand what might be possible to bring back to the engineering classroom to improve teaching, learning and the potential impact of hands-on engineering activities. By focusing on specific Makers who are building "toys" in the Maker community, we aim to illuminate their experiences and building and prototyping mindsets to determine how this might be adapted to advantage design in the engineering classroom. This research is guided by a primary research question: (RQ1) What are the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of toy Makers? We seek to be better informed of what is relevant for our cohort of toy Makers. It is of interest of how these items may overlap with similar questions about the activity of engineering design and for the community of engineering educators. Our findings inform a secondary research question: (RQ2) What can we learn from the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of toy Makers to advance teaching in the engineering classroom? Findings are presented to inform possibilities for design in engineering contexts and a multi-disciplinary, holistic attitude towards engineering education that is rising from discussions on the future of engineering education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society
PublisherAmerican Society for Engineering Education
StatePublished - 2015
Event2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition - Seattle, United States
Duration: Jun 14 2015Jun 17 2015

Other

Other2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period6/14/156/17/15

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Teaching
Engineering education
Industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Foster, C. H., Dickens, M., Jordan, S., & Lande, M. (2015). Learning from toy makers in the field to inform teaching engineering design in the classroom. In 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society American Society for Engineering Education.

Learning from toy makers in the field to inform teaching engineering design in the classroom. / Foster, Chrissy Hobson; Dickens, Matthew; Jordan, Shawn; Lande, Micah.

122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society. American Society for Engineering Education, 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Foster, CH, Dickens, M, Jordan, S & Lande, M 2015, Learning from toy makers in the field to inform teaching engineering design in the classroom. in 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society. American Society for Engineering Education, 2015 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Seattle, United States, 6/14/15.
Foster CH, Dickens M, Jordan S, Lande M. Learning from toy makers in the field to inform teaching engineering design in the classroom. In 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society. American Society for Engineering Education. 2015
Foster, Chrissy Hobson ; Dickens, Matthew ; Jordan, Shawn ; Lande, Micah. / Learning from toy makers in the field to inform teaching engineering design in the classroom. 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for Society. American Society for Engineering Education, 2015.
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