Learning from the human hand: Force control and perception using a soft-synergy prosthetic hand and noninvasive haptic feedback

Qiushi Fu, Marco Santello

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Force control and perception plays an important role in activities of daily living when handling objects with different physical properties. These abilities are results of complex sensorimotor pathways that coordinate movements, predict consequences, and process feedback. For prosthetic systems, the ability to exhibit human-like action and perception behavior is critical for the acceptance of the terminal device. In this chapter, we review recent findings obtained from a bioinspired soft-synergy prosthetic hand and a noninvasive mechanotactile feedback device. A series of experiments demonstrated the improvement in force control and perception in closed-loop prosthesis through context-aware myoelectric controllers and contralateral haptic training protocols. By comparing performances between human native hands and prosthetic hands, we provide novel insights on the importance of learning from human sensorimotor mechanisms in the design of upper-limb neuroprosthesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Motor Neuroprostheses
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages53-69
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9783030387402
ISBN (Print)9783030387396
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 10 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Force control
  • Haptic feedback
  • Neuroprosthetics
  • Perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Health Professions(all)

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