Learning from small devices: Deficits in problem solving performance but not factual recall

Christopher A. Sanchez, Russell Branaghan, James Z. Goolsbee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Given the increasing use of small screen devices to gather and provide important information, a critical question is how learning and problem solving performance is impacted by collecting data on a small device. This study investigates how learning and application of information differs when it is gathered using a small screen device versus a normal size desktop display. Results indicate that while factual recall is equivalent across interfaces, small screen devices appear to reduce how well participants apply these rules towards correct solutions. Further, it appears that solution time is also increased by using a small screen device. These results suggest that while these small technologies are convenient for fact gathering and other simple uses, there is a potential tradeoff when this learned information must be used in complex and appropriate ways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010
Pages1378-1381
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
Event54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 27 2010Oct 1 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period9/27/1010/1/10

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Sanchez, C. A., Branaghan, R., & Goolsbee, J. Z. (2010). Learning from small devices: Deficits in problem solving performance but not factual recall. In 54th Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2010, HFES 2010 (pp. 1378-1381). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2). https://doi.org/10.1518/107118110X12829369836003