Latino parents' links to deportees are associated with developmental disorders in their children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: To examine how Latino parent's personal connection to immigrants is linked to their children's risk of being referred/diagnosed with a developmental disorder. Methods: Using the 2015 Latino National Health and Immigration Survey (n = 548), we asked adults about their connections to immigrants. We also asked if their child has been referred/diagnosed with a developmental disorder. We estimated a series of regressions to predict increases in the probability of a child being referred/diagnosed for a developmental disorder. Results: Respondents who know a deportee are 2.4 times more likely (p = 0.009) to report that their child has been referred or diagnosed with a developmental disorder. Additionally, knowing more deportees, and having a closer family tie with deportees, are all statistically associated with developmental problems. Conclusions: This study adds to the emerging research on stress and child health, by examining the intersections of immigration policy, mental health, and child development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Parents
Emigration and Immigration
Child Development
Health Surveys
Mental Health
Research

Keywords

  • child developmental disorders
  • deportations
  • health disparities
  • Latino populations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

@article{5ade9d00fd19456abd9e2d42f2396cfe,
title = "Latino parents' links to deportees are associated with developmental disorders in their children",
abstract = "Aims: To examine how Latino parent's personal connection to immigrants is linked to their children's risk of being referred/diagnosed with a developmental disorder. Methods: Using the 2015 Latino National Health and Immigration Survey (n = 548), we asked adults about their connections to immigrants. We also asked if their child has been referred/diagnosed with a developmental disorder. We estimated a series of regressions to predict increases in the probability of a child being referred/diagnosed for a developmental disorder. Results: Respondents who know a deportee are 2.4 times more likely (p = 0.009) to report that their child has been referred or diagnosed with a developmental disorder. Additionally, knowing more deportees, and having a closer family tie with deportees, are all statistically associated with developmental problems. Conclusions: This study adds to the emerging research on stress and child health, by examining the intersections of immigration policy, mental health, and child development.",
keywords = "child developmental disorders, deportations, health disparities, Latino populations",
author = "Edward Vargas and Viridiana Benitez",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/jcop.22178",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Community Psychology",
issn = "0090-4392",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Latino parents' links to deportees are associated with developmental disorders in their children

AU - Vargas, Edward

AU - Benitez, Viridiana

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Aims: To examine how Latino parent's personal connection to immigrants is linked to their children's risk of being referred/diagnosed with a developmental disorder. Methods: Using the 2015 Latino National Health and Immigration Survey (n = 548), we asked adults about their connections to immigrants. We also asked if their child has been referred/diagnosed with a developmental disorder. We estimated a series of regressions to predict increases in the probability of a child being referred/diagnosed for a developmental disorder. Results: Respondents who know a deportee are 2.4 times more likely (p = 0.009) to report that their child has been referred or diagnosed with a developmental disorder. Additionally, knowing more deportees, and having a closer family tie with deportees, are all statistically associated with developmental problems. Conclusions: This study adds to the emerging research on stress and child health, by examining the intersections of immigration policy, mental health, and child development.

AB - Aims: To examine how Latino parent's personal connection to immigrants is linked to their children's risk of being referred/diagnosed with a developmental disorder. Methods: Using the 2015 Latino National Health and Immigration Survey (n = 548), we asked adults about their connections to immigrants. We also asked if their child has been referred/diagnosed with a developmental disorder. We estimated a series of regressions to predict increases in the probability of a child being referred/diagnosed for a developmental disorder. Results: Respondents who know a deportee are 2.4 times more likely (p = 0.009) to report that their child has been referred or diagnosed with a developmental disorder. Additionally, knowing more deportees, and having a closer family tie with deportees, are all statistically associated with developmental problems. Conclusions: This study adds to the emerging research on stress and child health, by examining the intersections of immigration policy, mental health, and child development.

KW - child developmental disorders

KW - deportations

KW - health disparities

KW - Latino populations

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85062545764&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85062545764&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jcop.22178

DO - 10.1002/jcop.22178

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Community Psychology

JF - Journal of Community Psychology

SN - 0090-4392

ER -