Latino Adolescents’ Academic Trajectories over the Transition to Higher Education: Variation by School and Neighborhood Contexts and Familism

Hye Jung Park, Jeri Sasser, Leah D. Doane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Latino college graduation rates continue to fall behind rates of other racial/ethnic groups, highlighting the importance of understanding risk and protective processes across the transition into higher education. The current study examined changes in socio-cultural contexts (i.e., campus and neighborhood co-ethnic composition) and academic achievement across the college transition for Latino adolescents and investigated whether familism values moderated associations. Participants were 188 Latino late-adolescents (Mage = 18.12; SD = 0.40; 62.9% female). Greater campus incongruency (i.e., decrease in co-ethnic composition) was associated with lower achievement for adolescents with low familism values, but not those with average or high levels. Change in neighborhood co-ethnic composition was not associated with achievement. Moving to incongruent campus contexts may be risky for Latino youth who report low levels of familism values, underscoring the importance of sociocultural protective processes in person-context transitions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1824-1838
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of youth and adolescence
Volume50
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Academic achievement
  • Co-ethnic composition
  • Familism
  • Latino adolescents
  • Person-context congruence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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