Late-stage academic entrepreneurship: Explaining why academic scientists collaborate with industry to commercialize their patents

Nisa Yazici Aydemir, Wan Ling Huang, Eric W. Welch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study expands the scope of research on academic entrepreneurship to include academic inventors who actively engage in late-stage commercialization. It investigates post-patent involvement of academic scientists in the development of products based on their patented inventions. Using data from a 2010 national survey of 798 academic inventors listed on patents assigned to universities in 2006, our analysis shows that only 27% of the inventors were working with a company to further develop their invention for commercial use. Additionally, academic inventors who reported stronger entrepreneurial orientation, higher commercial significance of the patent, lower reliance of the patent on scientific literature, and stronger entrepreneurial disposition of their university were more likely to engage in post-patent commercial development. Our work contributes to the literature on the entrepreneurial behavior of academic scientists by further exploring a critical but relatively understudied post-invention stage of commercialization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number121436
JournalTechnological Forecasting and Social Change
Volume176
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • academic entrepreneurship
  • inventors
  • patents
  • post-patent commercial development
  • research commercialization
  • university-industry collaboration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Applied Psychology
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

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