Laser micromachining of silicon: A new technique for fabricating terahertz imaging arrays

Christopher K. Walker, Aimee L. Hungerford, Gopal Narayanan, Christopher Groppi, Theodore M. Bloomstein, Stephen T. Palmacci, Margaret B. Stern, Jane E. Curtin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the main obstacles encountered in designing low noise, high efficiency, heterodyne receivers and local oscillator sources at submillimeter wavelengths is the quality and cost of waveguide structures. At wavelengths shorter than 400 micrometers, rectangular waveguide structures, feed-horns, and backshorts become extremely difficult to fabricate using standard machining techniques. We have used a new laser milling technique to fabricate high quality, THz waveguide components and feedhorns. Once metallized, the structures have the properties of standard waveguide components. Unlike waveguide components made using silicon wet-etching techniques, laser-etched components can have almost any cross section, from rectangular to circular. Under computer control, the entire waveguide structure (including the corrugated feedhorn a submillimeter-wave mixer or multiplier can be fabricated to micrometer tolerances in a few hours. Laser etching permits the direct scaling of successful waveguide multiplier and mixer designs to THz frequencies. Since the entire process is computer controlled, the cost of fabricating submillimeter waveguide components is significantly reduced. With this new laser etching process, the construction of high performance waveguide array receivers at THz frequencies becomes tractable. In this paper we will describe the laser etching technique and discuss how it can be used to construct THz imaging arrays. We will also describe the construction of a prototype 810 GHz mixer which utilizes these new construction techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Pages45-52
Number of pages8
Volume3357
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
EventAdvanced Technology MMW, Radio, and Terahertz Telescopes - Kona, HI, United States
Duration: Mar 26 1998Mar 26 1998

Other

OtherAdvanced Technology MMW, Radio, and Terahertz Telescopes
CountryUnited States
CityKona, HI
Period3/26/983/26/98

Fingerprint

Terahertz Imaging
laser machining
Micromachining
Waveguide components
Silicon
Waveguide
Laser
waveguides
Imaging techniques
Waveguides
Lasers
silicon
Etching
etching
lasers
multipliers
Submillimeter waves
Wavelength
Rectangular waveguides
Wet etching

Keywords

  • Micromachining
  • Mixers
  • Waveguide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Walker, C. K., Hungerford, A. L., Narayanan, G., Groppi, C., Bloomstein, T. M., Palmacci, S. T., ... Curtin, J. E. (1998). Laser micromachining of silicon: A new technique for fabricating terahertz imaging arrays. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 3357, pp. 45-52) https://doi.org/10.1117/12.317377

Laser micromachining of silicon : A new technique for fabricating terahertz imaging arrays. / Walker, Christopher K.; Hungerford, Aimee L.; Narayanan, Gopal; Groppi, Christopher; Bloomstein, Theodore M.; Palmacci, Stephen T.; Stern, Margaret B.; Curtin, Jane E.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3357 1998. p. 45-52.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Walker, CK, Hungerford, AL, Narayanan, G, Groppi, C, Bloomstein, TM, Palmacci, ST, Stern, MB & Curtin, JE 1998, Laser micromachining of silicon: A new technique for fabricating terahertz imaging arrays. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 3357, pp. 45-52, Advanced Technology MMW, Radio, and Terahertz Telescopes, Kona, HI, United States, 3/26/98. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.317377
Walker CK, Hungerford AL, Narayanan G, Groppi C, Bloomstein TM, Palmacci ST et al. Laser micromachining of silicon: A new technique for fabricating terahertz imaging arrays. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3357. 1998. p. 45-52 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.317377
Walker, Christopher K. ; Hungerford, Aimee L. ; Narayanan, Gopal ; Groppi, Christopher ; Bloomstein, Theodore M. ; Palmacci, Stephen T. ; Stern, Margaret B. ; Curtin, Jane E. / Laser micromachining of silicon : A new technique for fabricating terahertz imaging arrays. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3357 1998. pp. 45-52
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