Knee kinematic profiles during drop landings

A biplane fluoroscopy study

Michael R. Torry, Kevin B. Shelburne, Daniel Peterson, J. Erik Giphart, Jacob P. Krong, Casey Myers, J. Richard Steadman, Savio L Y Woo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The six degrees of freedom knee motion during dynamic activities is not well understood. Purpose: Biplane fluoroscopy was used to measure the three-dimensional rotations and translations of healthy knees during stiff drop landings and to determine the relationships between three-dimensional rotations and anterior (ATT) and lateral tibial translations (LTT). Methods: Six males performed stiff drop landings from 40 cm while being filmed using a high-speed, biplane fluoroscopy system. Initial, peak, and excursions for rotations and translations were calculated, and relationships and changes in these variables were assessed (α = 0.05). Results: Knee flexion at contact was 13.9° ± 9.2° (mean ± SD) and increased to a peak of 44.0° ± 17.2° with an excursion of 31.5° ± 14.1°. Knee varus/valgus angle at contact was -0.3° ± 1.8° varus; subjects progressed into a mean peak valgus position of 1.5° ± 0.9° with total excursion of 2.5° ± 0.9°. Four of six subjects landed externally rotated (2.5° ± 3.0°); two landed internally rotated (-4.9° ± 1.5°), yielding a contact angle of -2.4° ± 3.0° of internal rotation, a peak internal rotation of -5.5° ± 6.0°, and excursion of 3.1° ± 5.5°. Peak ATT were 4.3 ± 0.7 mm (excursion = 2.1 ± 0.9 mm), occurring within 50 ms after contact. Peak LTT were 1.5 ± 1.4 mm (excursion = 2.6 ± 1.6 mm). Significant regressions were found between ATT and knee valgus angle (r = 0.39, P = 0.006), between LTT and internal rotation (r = 0.96, P < 0.0001), and between LTT and knee valgus angle (quadratic, r = 0.90, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: This study provides a direct correlation between knee valgus angle with knee ATT and LTT during drop landings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-541
Number of pages9
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fluoroscopy
Biomechanical Phenomena
Knee

Keywords

  • ACL
  • anterior tibial translation
  • biomechanics
  • valgus collapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Torry, M. R., Shelburne, K. B., Peterson, D., Giphart, J. E., Krong, J. P., Myers, C., ... Woo, S. L. Y. (2011). Knee kinematic profiles during drop landings: A biplane fluoroscopy study. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(3), 533-541. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181f1e491

Knee kinematic profiles during drop landings : A biplane fluoroscopy study. / Torry, Michael R.; Shelburne, Kevin B.; Peterson, Daniel; Giphart, J. Erik; Krong, Jacob P.; Myers, Casey; Steadman, J. Richard; Woo, Savio L Y.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 43, No. 3, 03.2011, p. 533-541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Torry, MR, Shelburne, KB, Peterson, D, Giphart, JE, Krong, JP, Myers, C, Steadman, JR & Woo, SLY 2011, 'Knee kinematic profiles during drop landings: A biplane fluoroscopy study', Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 43, no. 3, pp. 533-541. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181f1e491
Torry, Michael R. ; Shelburne, Kevin B. ; Peterson, Daniel ; Giphart, J. Erik ; Krong, Jacob P. ; Myers, Casey ; Steadman, J. Richard ; Woo, Savio L Y. / Knee kinematic profiles during drop landings : A biplane fluoroscopy study. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2011 ; Vol. 43, No. 3. pp. 533-541.
@article{54b06c5d85ae417d88befe4e88cc597a,
title = "Knee kinematic profiles during drop landings: A biplane fluoroscopy study",
abstract = "Introduction: The six degrees of freedom knee motion during dynamic activities is not well understood. Purpose: Biplane fluoroscopy was used to measure the three-dimensional rotations and translations of healthy knees during stiff drop landings and to determine the relationships between three-dimensional rotations and anterior (ATT) and lateral tibial translations (LTT). Methods: Six males performed stiff drop landings from 40 cm while being filmed using a high-speed, biplane fluoroscopy system. Initial, peak, and excursions for rotations and translations were calculated, and relationships and changes in these variables were assessed (α = 0.05). Results: Knee flexion at contact was 13.9° ± 9.2° (mean ± SD) and increased to a peak of 44.0° ± 17.2° with an excursion of 31.5° ± 14.1°. Knee varus/valgus angle at contact was -0.3° ± 1.8° varus; subjects progressed into a mean peak valgus position of 1.5° ± 0.9° with total excursion of 2.5° ± 0.9°. Four of six subjects landed externally rotated (2.5° ± 3.0°); two landed internally rotated (-4.9° ± 1.5°), yielding a contact angle of -2.4° ± 3.0° of internal rotation, a peak internal rotation of -5.5° ± 6.0°, and excursion of 3.1° ± 5.5°. Peak ATT were 4.3 ± 0.7 mm (excursion = 2.1 ± 0.9 mm), occurring within 50 ms after contact. Peak LTT were 1.5 ± 1.4 mm (excursion = 2.6 ± 1.6 mm). Significant regressions were found between ATT and knee valgus angle (r = 0.39, P = 0.006), between LTT and internal rotation (r = 0.96, P < 0.0001), and between LTT and knee valgus angle (quadratic, r = 0.90, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: This study provides a direct correlation between knee valgus angle with knee ATT and LTT during drop landings.",
keywords = "ACL, anterior tibial translation, biomechanics, valgus collapse",
author = "Torry, {Michael R.} and Shelburne, {Kevin B.} and Daniel Peterson and Giphart, {J. Erik} and Krong, {Jacob P.} and Casey Myers and Steadman, {J. Richard} and Woo, {Savio L Y}",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181f1e491",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "533--541",
journal = "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Knee kinematic profiles during drop landings

T2 - A biplane fluoroscopy study

AU - Torry, Michael R.

AU - Shelburne, Kevin B.

AU - Peterson, Daniel

AU - Giphart, J. Erik

AU - Krong, Jacob P.

AU - Myers, Casey

AU - Steadman, J. Richard

AU - Woo, Savio L Y

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - Introduction: The six degrees of freedom knee motion during dynamic activities is not well understood. Purpose: Biplane fluoroscopy was used to measure the three-dimensional rotations and translations of healthy knees during stiff drop landings and to determine the relationships between three-dimensional rotations and anterior (ATT) and lateral tibial translations (LTT). Methods: Six males performed stiff drop landings from 40 cm while being filmed using a high-speed, biplane fluoroscopy system. Initial, peak, and excursions for rotations and translations were calculated, and relationships and changes in these variables were assessed (α = 0.05). Results: Knee flexion at contact was 13.9° ± 9.2° (mean ± SD) and increased to a peak of 44.0° ± 17.2° with an excursion of 31.5° ± 14.1°. Knee varus/valgus angle at contact was -0.3° ± 1.8° varus; subjects progressed into a mean peak valgus position of 1.5° ± 0.9° with total excursion of 2.5° ± 0.9°. Four of six subjects landed externally rotated (2.5° ± 3.0°); two landed internally rotated (-4.9° ± 1.5°), yielding a contact angle of -2.4° ± 3.0° of internal rotation, a peak internal rotation of -5.5° ± 6.0°, and excursion of 3.1° ± 5.5°. Peak ATT were 4.3 ± 0.7 mm (excursion = 2.1 ± 0.9 mm), occurring within 50 ms after contact. Peak LTT were 1.5 ± 1.4 mm (excursion = 2.6 ± 1.6 mm). Significant regressions were found between ATT and knee valgus angle (r = 0.39, P = 0.006), between LTT and internal rotation (r = 0.96, P < 0.0001), and between LTT and knee valgus angle (quadratic, r = 0.90, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: This study provides a direct correlation between knee valgus angle with knee ATT and LTT during drop landings.

AB - Introduction: The six degrees of freedom knee motion during dynamic activities is not well understood. Purpose: Biplane fluoroscopy was used to measure the three-dimensional rotations and translations of healthy knees during stiff drop landings and to determine the relationships between three-dimensional rotations and anterior (ATT) and lateral tibial translations (LTT). Methods: Six males performed stiff drop landings from 40 cm while being filmed using a high-speed, biplane fluoroscopy system. Initial, peak, and excursions for rotations and translations were calculated, and relationships and changes in these variables were assessed (α = 0.05). Results: Knee flexion at contact was 13.9° ± 9.2° (mean ± SD) and increased to a peak of 44.0° ± 17.2° with an excursion of 31.5° ± 14.1°. Knee varus/valgus angle at contact was -0.3° ± 1.8° varus; subjects progressed into a mean peak valgus position of 1.5° ± 0.9° with total excursion of 2.5° ± 0.9°. Four of six subjects landed externally rotated (2.5° ± 3.0°); two landed internally rotated (-4.9° ± 1.5°), yielding a contact angle of -2.4° ± 3.0° of internal rotation, a peak internal rotation of -5.5° ± 6.0°, and excursion of 3.1° ± 5.5°. Peak ATT were 4.3 ± 0.7 mm (excursion = 2.1 ± 0.9 mm), occurring within 50 ms after contact. Peak LTT were 1.5 ± 1.4 mm (excursion = 2.6 ± 1.6 mm). Significant regressions were found between ATT and knee valgus angle (r = 0.39, P = 0.006), between LTT and internal rotation (r = 0.96, P < 0.0001), and between LTT and knee valgus angle (quadratic, r = 0.90, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: This study provides a direct correlation between knee valgus angle with knee ATT and LTT during drop landings.

KW - ACL

KW - anterior tibial translation

KW - biomechanics

KW - valgus collapse

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952100585&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952100585&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181f1e491

DO - 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181f1e491

M3 - Article

VL - 43

SP - 533

EP - 541

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 3

ER -